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As an open-enrollment community college, our situation is different from
yours, but we divide our ESL curriculum in to oral, reading, and
composition because we find that students' strengths vary. Sometimes the
variance is oral versus reading/writing; sometimes students with strong
receptive skills (listening and reading comprehension) have weaker
productive skills (composition and speaking).
I don't have enough experience with TOEFL to know whether it gives any
clues on these issues.
A TOEFL of "slightly below 550" is still pretty strong. 


-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Laurie Hazard
Sent: Wednesday, February 18, 2009 2:00 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: ESL Assistance

Hello All,

 

My University is looking to develop a  semester  long ESL program.  It
is uncharted territory for us.  We want to accept students slightly
below our normal TOEFL score of 550, and give them a semester to develop
the skills/strategies to matriculate.  Does anyone have a curriculum
they'd like to share?  Or a syllabus?  We have a framework in mind, I
just want to see if we are running in the right direction.

 

At this point, even pointing me in the right direction would help.

 

As always, thanks!

 

Laurie


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