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I agree, Barry.  And whereas Granovetter does not use the term homophily in
making this point, Everett Rogers and Dilip Bhowmik do.  They write (p.530;
see cite below):

". . . communication . . . (between) participants who (are) completely
homophilous . . . (is) facile but totally redundant."

And while I'm on it, it's worth noting Ray Reagans's recent paper, which
teaches us when heterophily should be expected rather than homophily:

Reagans, R. (2005). "Preferences, identity and competition: Predicting tie
strength
from demographic data." Management Science, 51: 1374-1383.

Rogers, Everett M. and Dilip K. Bhowmik. "Homophily-Heterophily: Relational
Concepts for Communication Research." The Public Opinion Quarterly, Vol. 34,
No. 4 (Winter, 1970-1971), pp. 523-538.

-----Original Message-----
From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
Behalf Of Barry Wellman
Sent: Tuesday, June 02, 2009 8:29 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Granovetter -- the unHomophily

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I'd argue that Mark Granovetter's famous "The Strength of Weak Ties" is a
homophily article. As the implicit argument is that strong ties >
homophily > less diverse access to resources.

 Barry Wellman
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