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Thanks, Sam.

I haven't done much on these particular processes at the neighborhood
level. The closest thing is a 2007 paper on how much neighborhood
conditions can account for racial differences in the number of ties of
certain types that actors have:
http://home.uchicago.edu/~mariosmall/documents/Small_SSQ_2007.pdf

I think the second question deals with very interesting issues. Erin
Jacobs, Rebekah Massengill, and I just published a paper in Social
Forces on this topic. We conducted interviews with key players in a
particular subset of organizations in New York City, developed some
hypotheses about how their actions should affect the relationship
between neighborhood conditions and organizational networks, and then
tested these hypotheses based on a representative survey of
organizations (childcare centers). Click here:
http://home.uchicago.edu/~mariosmall/documents/SmallJacobsMassengill_2008.pdf

I would be very interested in hearing of other works in this area.

Best,

Mario



Sam Friedman wrote:
> Mario, this sounds like a wonderful book.
> Have you done any work on the related issues of similar processes at the 
> neighborhood level?
> Or on the causal pathways that shape the organizational or neighborhood 
> structures and processes that shape the network processes?
> best
> sam
> 
> 
> Sam Friedman
> National Development and Research Institutes
> 71 West 23d Street, 8th floor
> New York, NY 10010
> USA
> 1 212 845 4467
> Fax 1 917 438 0894
> [log in to unmask]
> 
>  >>> Mario Small <[log in to unmask]> 06/02/09 7:34 PM >>>
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
> 
> Dear colleagues,
> 
> A book that may be of interest was just released. A critique of social
> capital theory, it examines how the institutional conditions of routine
> organizations affect network formation.
> 
> 
> Unanticipated Gains: Origins of Network Inequality in Everyday Life
> Mario Luis Small, 2009
> Oxford University Press
> http://tinyurl.com/laomzd
> 
> 
>  From the publisher:
> Social capital theorists have shown that some people do better than
> others in part because they enjoy larger, more supportive, or otherwise
> more useful networks. But why do some people have better networks than
> others? *Unanticipated Gains* argues that the practice and structure of
> the churches, colleges, firms, gyms, childcare centers, and schools in
> which people happen to participate routinely matter more than their
> deliberate "networking."
> 
> Exploring the experiences of New York City mothers whose children were
> enrolled in childcare centers, this book examines why a great deal of
> these mothers, after enrolling their children, dramatically expanded
> both the size and usefulness of their personal networks. Whether, how,
> and how much the mother's networks were altered--and how useful these
> networks were--depended on the apparently trivial, but remarkably
> consequential, practices and regulations of the centers. The structure
> of parent-teacher organizations, the frequency of fieldtrips, and the
> rules regarding drop-off and pick-up times all affected the mothers'
> networks. Relying on scores of in-depth interviews with mothers,
> quantitative data on both mothers and centers, and detailed case studies
> of other routine organizations, Small shows that how much people gain
> from their connections depends substantially on institutional conditions
> they often do not control, and through everyday processes they may not
> even be aware of.
> 
> Emphasizing not the connections that people make, but the context in
> which they are made, *Unanticipated Gains* presents a major new
> perspective on social capital and on the mechanisms producing social
> inequality.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> _________________________________
> Mario Luis Small
> Associate Professor of Sociology and the College
> University of Chicago
> 1126 East 59th Street
> Chicago, IL 60637
> 
> http://home.uchicago.edu/~mariosmall
> 
> _____________________________________________________________________
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-- 
_________________________________
Mario Luis Small
Associate Professor of Sociology and the College
University of Chicago
1126 East 59th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

http://home.uchicago.edu/~mariosmall

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
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