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In an article a colleague and me got published recently in germany, we 
used social exchange theory (e.g. Blau 1964; Edwards 1969) as a 
foundation for homophily in choosing contact partners (in 
online-dating). The central idea is that homophily in respect to certain 
resources is a byproduct of exchange processes. If nobody would be 
willing to associate with somebody having 'lower' ressources to offer 
than him-/herself, the exchange 'market' eventually will bring out 
pairs/couples of individuals that are homogenous in respect to 
ressources like education, physical attractiveness etc.

Blau, Peter M., 1964: Exchange and power in social life. New York, NY: 
Wiley.

Edwards, John N., 1969: Familial Behavior as Social Exchange, in: 
Journal of Marriage and the Family 31, 518–526.


best regard

*********************************************
Jan Skopek, Dipl.-Kfm.

Faculty for Social and Economic Sciences
Chair of Sociology I
Otto-Friedrich-University Bamberg

Fakultät Sozial- und  Wirtschaftswissenschaften
Lehrstuhl Soziologie I
Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

Lichtenhaidestr. 11
96052 Bamberg (Germany)
Tel. +49-951-863 3120
Fax. +49-951-863 2597
Email: [log in to unmask]
www: http://www.uni-bamberg.de/sowi/soziologie-i/

http://www.partnerwahlforschung.de
*********************************************

Barry Wellman schrieb:
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> 
> I'd argue that Mark Granovetter's famous "The Strength of Weak Ties" is a
> homophily article. As the implicit argument is that strong ties >
> homophily > less diverse access to resources.
> 
>  Barry Wellman
>  _______________________________________________________________________
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