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I don't know if others have seen this, but I found it an interesting 
application of network ideas.  It also gives one pause regarding all of 
our work in social science.  Basically, the author traced a recent 
scientific "belief" proposed in medical research that is probably untrue 
but lived and became believed to be true through a pattern of citations, 
even though the preponderance of evidence did not support that belief.  

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/339/jul20_3/b2680

The authors draw mostly on Kleinberg's and Newman's network work. Can we 
improve on this analysis, say, with some good old fashioned 
Friedkin-Johnsen social influence modeling?

-David

-- 
--------------------
David Krackhardt, Professor of Organizations, Executive Editor of JoSS
Heinz College of Public Policy and Management, and
    The Tepper School of Business
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
412-268-4758
website: www.andrew.cmu.edu/~krack
    (Erdos#=2) 

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