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Thanks Maureen,
Being somewhat simple minded, can you give me a specific example of   "each 
of
which produces records that accumulate rapidly in that particular  location
(on that server processed by that module of the software) which may  be more
or less readable by non-system experts (e.g. by attorneys).".
 
 I read what you are saying, but unsure as to an  instance, application or 
report. And honestly, I have not ever worked with  huge mega systems of data 
where this occurs.  Or at least on the smaller  applications, I am not 
aware this is happening in the background.
 
Trudy M.  Phillips
File Management, LLC 
"Bringing Order Out of  Chaos"
8440 Lanewood Circle 
Leeds, AL 35094
Office:  205/699-8571   Fax: 205/699-3278 
_www.filemanagement.com_ (http://www.filemanagement.com/)  


In a message dated 8/6/2009 7:56:58 P.M. Central Daylight Time,  
[log in to unmask] writes:

Well the  distinction between raw data and final 'record' gets blurred with
big  complex systems: there may be two dozen middle processing steps, each  
of
which produces records that accumulate rapidly in that particular  location
(on that server processed by that module of the software) which  may be more
or less readable by non-system experts (e.g. by attorneys).  These 'raw
data' middle-step processing records may specifically be  required in law
suits when the issue is the way the system processed the  data; so the data
in module 1 must be compared with the same data in module  2 and so on
through the data's journey to becoming a final record that, for  example was
the basis of a company decision and/or  that was mailed to  a customer.

Maureen

On Thu, Aug 6, 2009 at 5:06 PM, Trudy M  Phillips <[log in to unmask]> 
wrote:

> Well, I am not  understanding this conversation thread at all.
>
> I thought we  had determined that data in a database or in a spreadsheet 
was
>   just data until a report was created from the data and such report was
>  would be  attached to the retention period for which the report  was
> created?
> So, how can you parse sections of a  database?   To me, databases are  in 
a
> continual state  of flux?  Data changes, sometimes by the  minute.   I  do
> not
> see a database as being stagnant so there for   needing a retention period
> requirement.
>
> Now if it is a  database, that was created for a specific purpose and not
> changed  afterwards, then yes I can see that it could then become 
something
>  with  a retention period.
>
> Trudy M.  Phillips
>  File Management, LLC
> "Bringing Order Out of  Chaos"
> 8440  Lanewood Circle
> Leeds, AL 35094
> Office:   205/699-8571   Fax: 205/699-3278
> _www.filemanagement.com_  (http://www.filemanagement.com/)
>
>
> In a message dated  8/6/2009 5:19:38 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
>   [log in to unmask] writes:
>
> I  usually find out the  preference of the users or IT administrator and
> it's
> usually  one of three things: (1) to parse sections of the db and   
establish
> particular retention periods for each, (2) to run static  reports  and
> consider those the (only) 'records, (3) to retain  the whole database.  
The
> last option entails locking the down the  database at a certain point,  
e.g.
> at the end of a project, and  using the youngest record's creation  or
> modified date to begin  the retention period; this is similar to the
>  concept
> of  'closing the record series' (a phrase repeated in the UK   
government's
> ERMS requirements standard). The first option is  surprisingly  popular 
with
> some IT people if the database is big,  complex, with multiple  IT support
> people, strict capacity  limits, and if different business units  use
> different sections  of the system. The second option: it's difficult to
> reach
>  consensus on what to capture in a report, and what is important  will
>  change
> over time anyway, plus there are risks to  deleting the underlying  data
> (you
> never know what will  be needed in a law suit).
>
>
> --
>  Maureen,
>
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--  
Maureen,

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