Print

Print


*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

In Cliff Lampe et al.'s 2007 paper on Facebook, the concept of "social surveillance" is used in a roughly equivalent fashion to Thompson's "ambient awareness."  (i.e., the concept of a technical system being used to update ego about alters).

That work draws on Paul Resnick's concept of peripheral interaction, which in turn is influenced by Lave and Wenger's anthropologically/sociologically oriented theories of legitimate peripheral participation.  Chaining from Lave we get to theories of learning-in-action (Engestrom, etc) and structuration.

In the computing community, Ackerman and Starr's 1995 paper on "social activity indicators", and Erickson and Kellogg's "social translucence" are interesting field studies that look at the concept of mediated awareness.  Carroll et. al had a recent paper on the topic called "Beyond being aware."

These references cross disciplines, but in my exploration of this particular topic I've found good insight at the interaction of technology and social interaction.  Would love to find some middle-range work on the topic that IS disciplinary, though.  Maybe economic anthropology? 



Ackerman, M. S. and Starr, B.  (1995).  Social activity indicators: interface components for CSCW systems.  In UIST '95: Proceedings of the 8th annual ACM symposium on User interface and software technology, New York, NY, USA, 1995 (pp. 159-168).  ACM.

Carroll, J. M., Rosson, M. B., Farooq, U., and Xiao, L.  (2009).  Beyond being aware.  Information and Organization.

Erickson, T. and Kellogg, W. A.  (2000).  Social translucence: an approach to designing systems that support social processes.  ACM Trans. Computer-Human Interaction, 7(1), 59-83.  

Lampe, C., Ellison, N., and Steinfeld, C.  (2006).  A Face(book) in the Crowd: Social Searching vs. Social Browsing.  In Proceedings of CSCW 2006 (pp. 167-170).  

Lave, J. and Wenger, E.  (1991).  Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 

Resnick, P.  (2001).  Beyond Bowling Together: SocioTechnical Capital. In Carroll, J. (Ed.), HCI in the New Millenium. Addison-Wesley. 



On Feb 19, 2010, at 2:30 AM, Haenlein, Michael wrote:

> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
> Dear all,
> 
>  
> I am looking for theories about "ambient awareness".
>  
> In his NYT article "Brave New World of Digital Intimacy" about social media, Clive Thompson wrote:
>  
> "In essence, Facebook users didn’t think they wanted constant, up-to-the-minute updates on what other people are doing. Yet when they experienced this sort of omnipresent knowledge, they found it intriguing and addictive. Why? Social scientists have a name for this sort of incessant online contact. They call it “ambient awareness.” It is, they say, very much like being physically near someone and picking up on his mood through the little things he does — body language, sighs, stray comments — out of the corner of your eye."
>  
> I have been looking for sociology theories explaining  "ambient awareness" but have trouble of identifying main sources to this subject. Are there any seminal papers to this subject ? Are there any connected theories, any papers relevant for this subject?
> 
> Thanks very much in advance,
> 
> Michael
> 
>  
> Michael Haenlein
> Associate Professor of Marketing
> ESCP Europe
> Paris, France
> 
>  
> _____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.


--
Fred Stutzman 
Ph.D. Student and Teaching Fellow 
School of Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill 
[log in to unmask] | (919) 260-8508 | http://fredstutzman.com/ 


_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.