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Dear Lorrainne Kisselburgh,
 
MIT's Senseable city lab organized a conference in October, “Engaging data: First International Forum on the Application and Management of Personal Electronic Information” which included a specific session on privacy hazards when doing SNA on large datasets which are increasingly available. Some of the resources (pdfs and video) on the conferences website (http://senseable.mit.edu/engagingdata/downloads.html) might be interesting for your article.
 
In particular I would recommend:
 
The plenary talks of Trevor Hughes and Alex Pentland, and the panel sessions on data privacy, http://senseable.mit.edu/engagingdata/program.html]
 
Of the papers presented in the parallel breakout sessions, the following explicitly address emerging privacy issues:
 
Christophe Aguiton, Dominique Cardon, & Zbigniew Smoreda, Living Maps New data, new uses, new problems (http://senseable.mit.edu/engagingdata/papers/ED_SI_Living_Maps.pdf),
 
Solon Barocas & Helen Nissenbaum, On Notice: The Trouble with Notice and Consent (http://senseable.mit.edu/engagingdata/papers/ED_SII_On_Notice.pdf)
 
Kurt Iveson, Too public or too private? The politics of privacy in the real-time city, (http://senseable.mit.edu/engagingdata/papers/ED_SII_Too_Public_or_Too_Private.pdf)

Anmol Madan, Benjamin Waber, Margaret Ding, Paul Kominers, Alex Pentland, Reality Mining: The End of Personal Privacy, (http://senseable.mit.edu/engagingdata/papers/ED_SIII_Reality_Mining_and_Personal_Privacy.pdf)

And lastly, the research group of which I am a part presented a paper which addresses the issue that large datasets could lead to the identification of 'pivotal members' in social movements and communities outside their own consent. Michiel van Meeteren, Ate Poorthuis, Elenna Dugundji; Mapping communities in large virtual social networks (http://senseable.mit.edu/engagingdata/papers/ED_SIII_Mapping_Communities_in_Large_Virtual_Social_Networks.pdf)
 
I would also like to ask you whether it would be possible to post a summary of all references received from people on the list, back to the SOCNET listserve. Privacy issues in SNA are such an important topic at the moment since so many new applications are possible of which we still have to grasp the ethical and wider societal consequences.
 
Best regards,
 
Michiel van Meeteren
University of Amsterdam


On Feb 19, 2010, at 16:51, Kisselburgh, Lorraine G wrote:

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Dear colleagues,

Following Thomas’ lead, I am writing an article about “Privacy in Networks” for the Encyclopedia of Social Networking volume edited by Barnett and Golson.  In order to represent important research, I would appreciate receiving any information, in any format, from members of the community in order to remind me of both research and conceptual contributions that have been made under this topic.

You’re welcome to reply off-list to me directly at: [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask].  

Thanks so very much for your notes.

Regards,
Lorraine
----------
Lorraine Kisselburgh, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Communication
Purdue University
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