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Saundra,

There's no need to apologize for your PP. I can see why students have 
responded well.  It is accessible but doesn't water down expectations 
for adequate research and practice. Would you allow for sharing with 
others so long as I give you the well-deserved credit?

Even though I'm here in Indiana, I'm happy for the Saints' fans. Their 
victory couldn't have come at a better time.

Saundra Y McGuire wrote:
> I agree with all of the comments to date, and think all of these factors are important.  However, I often find that a HUGE difference between students who do well with presentations and those who don't is...drum roll please... preparation and practice!!!
>
> I'm attaching a PP I've done for students who need to do presentations, and I've gotten good feedback.  The focus is on research presentations because I work with many STEM students.  And it's not visually pretty, as I developed it in my early days of learning power point.  And I'm still a self-described technophobic dinosaur!  But the content seems to resonate with most students who are anxious about preparing a presentation.  
>
> A Euphoric Member of the WHO DAT Nation!
> Saundra
>
> Saundra McGuire, Ph.D. 
> Assistant Vice Chancellor for Learning and Teaching
> Professor, Department of Chemistry
> 736 Choppin Hall
> Louisiana State University
> Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> 225.578.6749 phone
> 225.578.2696 fax
> www.cas.lsu.edu
> Saundra Y. McGuire, Ph.D.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Mayfield, Linda
> Sent: Monday, February 08, 2010 11:05 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: developmental students and presentations
>
> One more issue to consider is the students' technology generation. One broad division is Prensky's " digital natives and digital immigrants," but in an educational technology course I took last summer that included designing avatars and interactive educational web sites, I wanted to add a sub-category to "digital immigrants"--"digital dinosaurs"!  I completely agree that acknowledging and articulating the goal of the assignment--demonstrating content knowledge or technology knowledge or both--is critical for both the instructor and the student.
> Linda
>
> Linda Riggs Mayfield, MA
> Associate Faculty
> Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing
> Broadway @ 11th Street, Box 7005
> Quincy, IL  62305-7005
> 217-228-5520 x 6997
> [log in to unmask]
> ________________________________________
> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Ertel, Susan [[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Monday, February 08, 2010 10:18 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: developmental students and presentations
>
> I would piggyback on Nic's comments.
>
> Is the question related to the COGNITIVE ABILITY of the students or is the question related to how well the students can manipulate technology?
>
> Do the students possess the basic knowledge necessary to provide a clear presentation without technology? If so, then what is the point of the technology? Is it an arbitrary hoop that the faculty member has decided he or she wants the students to use?
>
> If the point of the exercise is to teach Powerpoint skills, then the instructor needs to have clear guidelines and rubrics for the students to follow to improve their Powerpoint skills. However, if the point of the exercise is for students to show how much they know about a subject, then they should not be limited to just Powerpoint.
>
> There is a great article entitled "Teaching Naked" which addresses this issue. I think it appeared in The Chronicle a couple of years ago.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Nic Voge
> Sent: Monday, February 08, 2010 9:13 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: developmental students and presentations
>
> I think there is always a concern that we locate the cause of
> difficulties students experience IN the students themselves. There
> seems to be a tacit assumption built into this discussion that some
> "developmental students" are challenged by doing Powerpoint
> presentations BECAUSE they are so labeled. I think we need to
> interrupt this easy association and think more broadly if we are to
> truly understand the causes of our unmet expectations.
>
> Consider, for instance, many faculty regularly present terrible
> powerpoint presentations. Is anyone suggesting this is BECAUSE they
> are faculty?  I'm pretty practiced at giving presentations and have
> found that Powerpoint can constrain my effectiveness. No less than
> Edward Tufte has written that "Powerpoint makes you dumb" http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/nytimes_1203
>
> Instead of working from weakness, you might, in this era of access to
> myriad self-presentation, ask students to identify instances when
> they, and others, have effectively presented something and try to
> distill what makes these instances effective or not. Ask them to
> construct their target, their own criteria.
>
> I suspect there are many reasons why presenters' Powerpoints can be
> ineffective, ranging from understanding of task and audience,
> preparation/practice, domain knowledge, unfamiliarity with the
> software, and inherent limitations of Powerpoint.
>
> I think starting with an articulated task-analysis of what we are
> asking of them (not merely a  rubric, but that's a start) and helping
> students to identify when and when they have not made effective
> presentations and asking them to figure out how they would transfer
> their insights (put into the form of a "checklist" perhaps)  to the
> current task is a core of any approach I would take.
>
> Getting back to the point I made at the outset. Because, ultimately,
> it is a student who "must" make the changes  in their actions,
> thinking, beliefs, etc. to solve a problem and be successful in an
> academic context it does not follow that the problem is inherent in
> them. Many student difficulties arise because of factors or features
> outside of them (such as poor instruction or inexplicit expectations),
> but because of power inequities the responsibility to ameliorate them
> fall to students.
>
> Best,
> Nic
>
> On Feb 8, 2010, at 10:34 AM, Gary K. Probst wrote:
>
>   
>> From:  [log in to unmask]
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Sent: Monday, February 8, 2010 Subject:
>> Re: developmental students and presentations
>>
>>
>>
>> College faculty members need to be enlisted to support developmental
>> students because only they can reward students for practicing what
>> is taught in your developmental studies program.   You could give a
>> seminar to faculty members and students showing how cognitive maps
>> or templates are used as a framework to organize information in a
>> presentation.   For example, the following organization could be
>> used for many topics:
>>
>> Problem: (define the problem) Developmental students cannot give
>> effective PowerPoint presentations
>>    Give examples of problem:
>>
>> Effect of Problem:   Developmental students cannot participate fully
>> in credit courses
>>   Give examples of effect:
>>
>> Cause of problem:   Inability to develop and use a framework to
>> organize ideas.
>>    Give examples of cause:
>>
>> Solution to the problem:
>>    1.   Obtain:   Instruct students to use cognitive maps to
>> organize information when reading and writing.
>>    2.   Retain:   Developmental students in college courses
>>    3.   Eliminate:   a . Developmental students having a fear and
>> inability of making a class presentation.
>>                                  b. Developmental students receiving
>> a poor grade even if they have learned the
>>                                       material in the course.
>>    4.   Avoid:   a. Having developmental students do poorly because
>> of the inability to organize
>>                               information in a required PowerPoint
>> presentation
>>                       b. Having the learning center or developmental
>> program appear it is not preparing
>>                            students for credit courses.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "FLC" <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Sent: Sunday, February 7, 2010 7:48:40 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
>> Subject: Re: developmental students and presentations
>>
>> It may seem simplistic for me to suggest the following:
>> 1. Model the use of PowerPoint with your students.
>> 2.Preferably this ought to be done as they are with you in a
>> computer lab
>> and can imitate the functions as you demonstrate them
>> 3. Encourage  questions after each PP function that is demonstrated.
>>
>> I hope that this is helpful.    Collegially......
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Deborah LeClaire
>> Sent: Friday, February 05, 2010 2:23 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: developmental students and presentations
>>
>>
>> There is a big movement here to have students give oral
>> presentations/ power
>> points to demonstrate their learning.  Recently I have had some
>> faculty come
>> to me and say that they are having a difficult time getting the more
>> developmental students to be successful in their presentations.
>>
>> Does anyone know any techniques/research that I can mention to the
>> faculty
>> about presentations and developmental students?
>>
>> Many thanks-
>> Deborah
>>
>>
>>
>> Deborah LeClaire
>> Learning Center Director
>> Leech Lake Tribal College
>> PO Box 180, 6945 Little Wolf Road NW
>> Cass Lake MN 56633
>>
>> office: (218) 335-4242
>> cell: (218) 252-6959
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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>
> ____________________________________
> Dominic (Nic) J. Voge
> [log in to unmask]
> (609)258-6921
>
> Associate Director
> McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning
> 328C Frist Campus Center
> Princeton University
> Princeton, NJ 08544
>
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Goshen College
1700 South Main Street
Goshen, IN 46526
574-535-7576
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