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*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

Hi –

"... decay of information quality (and flow) with increasing social network
distance..."

Try –

The Social Life of Information
http://hbswk.hbs.edu/archive/1403.html

and 

Situating the Zone of Proximal Development
http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/summer82/marsh82.htm


For starters.

-j
 
John Maloney
The Future of Networks
Mail: http://1id.com/=jheuristic
Web: http://www.futureofnetworks.com
Blog: http://networksingularity.com 
Twitter: http://twitter.com/jheuristic  
Tel:  415.902.9676
Fax: 415.276.6074
Skype: jheuristic

From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
Behalf Of Sam Roberts
Sent: Friday, July 30, 2010 1:42 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [SOCNET] Decay of information quality and flow with social
network distance

***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org ***** 
Hi Dylan,

I am not sure this is quite what you are after, but Alex Mesoudi has done
quite a bit of work looking at information transmission along chains of
participants – both empirical and theoretical. Here is a reference and the
abstract for one of his papers. 

Mesoudi, A., Whiten, A., & Dunbar, R. (2006). A bias for social information
in human cultural transmission. British Journal of Psychology, 97, 405-423.

Evolutionary theories concerning the origins of human intelligence suggest
that cultural
transmission might be biased toward social over non-social information. This
was
tested by passing social and non-social information along multiple chains of
participants.
Experiment 1 found that gossip, defined as information about intense
third-party social
relationships, was transmitted with significantly greater accuracy and in
significantly
greater quantity than equivalent non-social information concerning
individual behaviour
or the physical environment. Experiment 2 replicated this finding
controlling for
narrative coherence, and additionally found that information concerning
everyday nongossip
social interactions was transmitted just as well as the intense gossip
interactions.
It was therefore concluded that human cultural transmission is biased toward
information concerning social interactions over equivalent non-social
information.


I am not aware of similar work done on social networks rather than simple
chains of participants, but would be interested in finding out.

Best wishes,

Sam


***********************************************
Dr Sam Roberts,
Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology,
University of Oxford,
64 Banbury Road,
Oxford,   OX2 6PN

Tel: 01865 612376
***********************************************

Homepage: http://www.icea.ox.ac.uk/about-us/staff/dr-sam-roberts/

TESS Project: http://www.mbs.ac.uk/research/DTESS.aspx



From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
Behalf Of Dylan Walker
Sent: 30 July 2010 04:49
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [SOCNET] Decay of information quality and flow with social network
distance

***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org ***** 
Hi,

I was wondering if anyone could point me to some literature that deals with
the decay of information quality (and flow) with increasing social network
distance from the source.  I’m aware of some work, but perhaps I’m not
looking in the right places:
-regarding flow and homophily (Wu, Adamic, et al. “Information Flow in
Social Groups”)
- Sorenson et al., “Complexity, Networks and Knowledge”

However, what I have found seems to relate more to transmission and
search/availability/propagation of information rather than accumulation of
errors.  Interestingly, I find references in a variety of papers to the
child’s game of telephone in which information distortion occurs over a
chain of serial communications; surely someone has investigated this
question empirically on a social network?

I am particularly interested in empirical work (rather than purely
theoretical models).

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Dylan Walker
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