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When I attended the recent CRLA conference in Salt Lake City, I attended
a fabulous session on teaching vocabulary presented by a professor from
Kent State University (I am sorry that I cannot locate her name right
now; perhaps someone else can supply it.) Anyway, after presenting the
most recent research on teaching vocabulary, she offered several
practical applications. One idea was to have students make DAM cards.

1) Define the word on one side of the card.
2) Apply the word in a relevant way for the student on the other side.
3) Make connections with another idea or class.

Also, you can ask the student to draw a picture which will act as a
trigger for the word's definition. I tried this when I returned to my
campus and it was great.

Vicki Lefevre
Ohio Dominican University

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Pamela Krueger
Sent: Monday, November 29, 2010 1:54 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Question on teaching vocabulary

I agree with the person who mentioned that the best way to increase
reading vocabulary is by reading. In addition, a very quick way to
increase vocabulary is to learn Latin root words, prefixes, suffixes,
and Greek word parts. These types of words make up a very large
percentage of words in English and are the types of words found in
textbooks. There are many books that outline which word parts are the
easiest and most valuable to teach first.


Pam Krueger
English Learning Assistant, Adjunct Instructor
Bismarck State College
PO Box 5587
Bismarck ND 58506-5587
701-224-5615




-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Donna Hill
Sent: Monday, November 29, 2010 11:04 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Question on teaching vocabulary

Our vice president in charge of Adult Ed forwarded me the following
email asking if I had any suggestions. He'd like to set up some type of
professional development for his instructors on teaching vocabulary.
Anybody have any ideas?

 >> >> Blake, It is an observation with our students, they do not have
the VOCABULARY knowledge when studying for the GED test's Science,
Social Studies & Language Arts, Reading sections THEN, those that are
preparing for the COMPASS test. They come across words that they just do
not know. For example, these come from the PE version of the Practice Test:
melancholy
constituent
immobilized
hybrid
abolitioist
tolerance
effacement
prospective

Is there a system for teaching vocabulary/lists of
suggested-words-one-might-need-to-know for high school/college level?<<

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