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Prof Paulos suggests an amendment to his article (already in print on my 
desk).

  Barry Wellman
  _______________________________________________________________________

   S.D. Clark Professor of Sociology, FRSC               NetLab Director
   Department of Sociology                  725 Spadina Avenue, Room 388
   University of Toronto   Toronto Canada M5S 2J4   twitter:barrywellman
   http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman             fax:+1-416-978-3963
   Updating history:      http://chass.utoronto.ca/oldnew/cybertimes.php
  _______________________________________________________________________


---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2011 11:03:23 -0500
From: J.A. Paulos <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask], Anna Kuchment <[log in to unmask]>
Cc: [log in to unmask]
Subject: friendship paradox

        In light of Barry Wellman's email, I think that my piece on
popularity in the online February issue of Scientific American should be
amended, if at all possible. The first line of the second paragraph should
read (addition in bold font):

This simple realization, *first  noted by sociologist Scott Feld in 1991, *is
relevant not only to real-life friends but also to social media.

           As I wrote earlier, I wasn't aware that the idea was linked to
anyone. It occurred to me because of my interest in social media.
                                             Best, John

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