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Thanks Mark. Sorry for the confusion thinking it was you. Yes. I meant degree exponent. 

However I'm certain that someone at NetSci10 talked about "classes" of networks based 
on the value of the exponent. Maybe the "classification" didn't go as high as 7... 
This presentation was given in the main room (where we had the
all the keynote addresses). I know my description of the presentation is far from useful but it is 
the only thing I can remember. I'd love to find what the discussion was about even if it doesn't apply to my data...

Ronaldo

On Mar 31, 2011, at 4:55 PM, Mark Newman wrote:

> It wasn't me.  Must have been someone else.
> 
> I think you probably don't mean degree.  You probably mean the degree exponent.  But if you have an exponent as large as 7, then it's unlikely you have a power law.  Power laws with exponents that large are, in practice, very hard to tell apart from exponentials or other rapidly decaying functions, and occur rarely in nature.  More likely what you have is an exponential.
> 
> Mark
> 
> 
> 
> On 03/31/2011 04:16 PM, Ronaldo Menezes wrote:
>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org ***** I'm dealing with a
>> network in which the degree of the power-law distribution varies between
>> 7 and 9 (lambda).
>> I somehow think that someone at NetSci 2010 (maybe it was Mark Newman)
>> talked about networks
>> with high degree (and low as well) and even had a classification for
>> these networks. However I can't seem to find
>> anything on it. Does anyone know of any published work that looks at
>> these kinds of networks?
>> 
>> If you know of a published paper on this I'd appreciate a link.
>> 
>> Thanks
>> 
>> Ronaldo
>> 
>> 
>> *----*
>> *Ronaldo Menezes, PhD*
>> Associate Professor in Computer Science
>> Phone: +1 321 674-7623
>> Fax: +1 321 674-7046
>> cs.fit.edu/~rmenezes <http://cs.fit.edu/~rmenezes>
>> 
>> 
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