Print

Print


Paul--

"We left the car" does not convey that urgency and desperation of the boy who sees the train bearing down on the car and must pull his girlfriend out fast.  He is naturally "intense" about impending death.

Nora


On Mar 18, 2011, at 6:49 PM, Emmett, Paul wrote:

> Nora, Kathy, Alas, High School started for me in '59, so I do recall the "steady" concept, but that's just blood over a melancholic dam because Kathy is right. If she had just gotten the ring, however she planned on wearing it, she would not have it on. However, the INTENSE reaction of her steady makes it seem that this relationship has the "depth of time."
> I certianly agree that we need to know the lyrics, but I think we need to trust 'em too. If they didn't want "PULLED her out," there are plenty of options; How about "We'd left the car and we were safe, but she . . .." Won't win no Grammy, but it works metrically.
> I imposed "Teen Angel" on a new generation today in my Creative Writing class. They resisted the stalled on the RR tracks bit, and wanted to know who was driving.
> I think it's good for them, and me too I guess, to see that closer looks can be fun, so god bless the questions.
> Have good days,
> Paul 
>  
> From: Discussion Group for Psychology and the Arts [[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Katherine Bahr [[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Thursday, March 17, 2011 7:26 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Teen Angel
> 
> Paul,
> 
> I was referring to interpretations of words that do not actually  occur in the song, such as ‘box” and”loose.”  Certainly anyone can raise questions about any situation, lyrical or otherwise.   And of course there was the wax or string in the ring technique to make it fit, but wearing the ring around the neck was common as well.  Either way, if she just got the ring, she might not have waxed it or hung it yet.  
> 
> I suppose that if we want to analyze a song, we do need to know the lyrics.  That’s all.  
> 
> Kathy Bahr
> 
> 
> On 3/17/11 4:14 PM, "Emmett, Paul" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Nora, Kathy, I have most vivid memories, 60's memories, of Mary Ann enbalming my H.S. ring in some kind of yarn, and sporting it--as most of her friends did--on her finger. So Elvis or no, neck rings were not "de rigueur." And I don't think that saying the song raises questions entails a misunderstanding of the song lyrics; why, as I asked before, does he have to PULL her out of the car if it is merely stalled on the RR tracks? 
>  
> Paul Emmett
> 
>  
> From: Discussion Group for Psychology and the Arts [[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Katherine Bahr [[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Thursday, March 17, 2011 11:42 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Teen Angel
> 
> Nora, you are right on.  And if the boy had just given the ring to her, she would not have had a chance to put it on a necklace yet as girls did then.  I think the interesting point is that all the “interpretations” are based on misunderstandings of the song lyrics—almost on expectations of what they should be rather than what they are.  I can also see how one could be misled by the obit writer, but then I didn’t read the obit.
> 
> Kathy Bahr
> 
> 
> On 3/16/11 4:45 PM, "Nora F. Crow" <[log in to unmask] <https://mail.uwex.uwc.edu/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx> > wrote:
> 
> Dear All,
> 
> The writer of Jean Dinning's obit is clearly not in sync with his subject.  He asks about the ring, "Had it fallen off her finger?"  All of us who swayed to that song realized that high school girls did not wear their boyfriend's rings around their fingers.  They wore them, of course, around their necks.  As in Elvis's, "Won't you wear my ring/Around your neck/To show the world/I'm yours, by heck!" 
> 
> Best, Nora
> 
> 
> Nora F. Crow
> Professor
> English Language and Literature
> Wright Hall 217
> Smith College
> Northampton, MA  01063
> 
> Smith College official correspondence
> 
> 
> 

Nora F. Crow
Professor
English Language and Literature
Wright Hall 217
Smith College
Northampton, MA  01063

Smith College official correspondence