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I tried this with several grinds of "chicken feather meal" with several
types of epoxy many years ago- there was no joy. I could not "wet" the
feather bits with my formulation.  Polyester resin was worse.
Dave Carlson


On Sun, Apr 3, 2011 at 8:46 PM, Lindsy Iglesias
<[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> BBC News - Chicken feathers suggested as basis for plastics<http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12904777>
>
> "31 March 2011 Last updated at 19:39 ET
>
> Chicken feathers suggested as basis for plastics
>
> The millions of tonnes of chicken feathers discarded each year could be
> used in plastics, researchers say. A studyreported at the American Chemical
> Society meeting in the US suggests feathers could lead to more
> environment-friendly, lighter plastics.
>
> The chemical recipe requires significantly less petroleum-derived material.
>
>
> However, tests on a grander scale will be necessary to establish the idea's
> industrial feasibility.
>
> Such "biowaste" materials have been proposed as components of plastic
> formulations before.
>
> Feathers, like hair and fingernails, are made up principally of the tough
> and chemically stable protein keratin, and can lend strength while reducing
> weight in the mixtures of plastics chemicals known as composites.
>
> Researchers at the US agricultural authority have even published research
> into the possibility of incorporating chicken feathers into plastics, as an
> additive in composites that are made largely of a chemical polymer.
>
> But the work presented by Yiqi Yang, from the University of Nebraska,
> Lincoln, takes this idea further and uses the chicken feather fibres
> themselves as a principal ingredient - making up 50% of the mass of the
> composite.
>
> As a result, the plastics require less of the materials such as
> polyethylene and polypropylene that are derived from petroleum products.
>
> “We should pursue things like these, try and use biomaterials - certainly
> if it's waste otherwise - and make something useful” Renko Akkerman
> Thermoplastic Composites Research Centre, University of Twente
>
> "[Prior] technology uses keratin as an 'additive' to polyethylene and
> polypropylene. Our work turns feathers into something like polyethylene and
> polypropylene," Professor Yang told BBC News.
>
> "If used as composite materials, no polyethylene or polypropylene are
> needed. Therefore [the plastics] will be more degradable and more
> sustainable."
>
> Professor Yang's team processed chicken feathers and added a chemical known
> as methyl acrylate to turn them into a plastic, from which they made thin
> films.
>
> These films were tougher than comparable formulations using other biowaste
> materials, and Professor Yang said that a crucial advantage of the team's
> approach was that their plastics are much more resistant to water.
>
> Renko Akkerman, technical director of the Thermoplastic Composite Research
> Centre in the Netherlands, said that, depending on the application,
> feather-derived composites could be a strong addition to the palette of
> plastics.
>
> "Whenever you can use waste for a functional product, I'd say that's a good
> idea. So using biomaterials, whether it's for commodity products or even
> structural applications, that's worth pursuing," he told BBC News.
>
> However, he said that only by making larger amounts of the composite - and
> assessing the energy costs of production - could a full assessment of the
> idea be made.
>
> "For each material you can do things at a very minor scale, but making the
> transition to mass production is a large one and only then can you truly
> grade the performance in terms of economics, carbon footprint, and so on.
>
> "Despite all that we should pursue things like these, try and use
> biomaterials - certainly if it's waste otherwise - and make something
> useful."
>
>
> Lindsy Iglesiasbest
>
> - Sent using Google Toolbar
>



-- 
Dave Carlson
731 NW 91st St.
Gainesville, FL 32607 USA