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There have been a handful of studies assessing the accuracy of teachers' perceptions of children's peer networks in school settings. Perceptual accuracy is variously quantified as correspondence between teacher-identified friendships and peer reports of friendship.  The general finding is modest accuracy, but a shared premise of several research groups is that while teachers aren't 'in' these networks, they have a stake in the sense that being 'attuned' to network dynamics could help them manage classroom behavior and learning. There has been some attention to variability across teachers (kappa's for individual teachers ranged from .00 to .75 in one study), across types of kids (e.g., aggressive youth) and across types of classrooms (grade level, class size).  

Papers have appeared in the journal Social Development:
	Scott Gest (2006)
	Philip Rodkin et al (2009)
	Jennifer Watling Neal et al (in press, 2011; available online)

Good luck,
Scott



On Apr 26, 2011, at 9:45 AM, Lindsay Young wrote:

> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org ***** Hi all,
> 
> Piggy-backing on the current thread on network (mis)perception, I wanted to ask whether anyone can recommend literature that addresses third-party perceptions of social networks.  By "third-party" I mean observers of the social network of interest who themselves do not have stakes in the network.  So an example might be the public's perceptions of the organizational relationships amongst stakeholders in a public policy network, advocacy network or "issue network".  
> 
> I've come across one or two pieces on third-party perceptions of romantic relationships and another piece by Simpson, Markovsky, and Steketee (in press), which takes an experimental approach to evaluating the role that power plays in perceptual accuracy amongst subjects who are considered "third-parties" to the social network.  Other than that, however, I'm coming up empty. It could be that I'm not using the right keywords.  So any suggestions would be welcome.
> 
> Thanks in advance!
> 
> Cheers,
> Lindsay
> 
> -- 
> Lindsay Young
> Doctoral Student
> Northwestern University
> Communication Studies
> Media, Technology & Society Program
> 
> 
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---
Scott D. Gest, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Human Development & Family Studies
Pennsylvania State University

office: 814-865-3464
fax:	814-863-6207
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