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Hi Shevawn,

I run a drop in math lab, but I'm centralized, so I serve all math classes on campus -- which happen to be from basic math to upper division stuff like Calc III,  linear algebra, probability, etc.

We use student employees, mostly.  Often they "grow" into upper division tutors.  I require a new tutor to have completed Calc I. The majority of the tutoring we do is in algebra, so they must also pass an algebra test. (As well as get letters of recommendation, etc, per the CRLA certification requirements). 

We are a university now, but when I started in this position 11 years ago, we had recently changed from community college to four year college. The math degree was just being approved.  Most of my tutors were hired from a local university.  Over the years as the math program grew, I was eventually able to hire our own math students - as student employees. I maintain an "advanced tutor" position on the non-student job board for multiple reasons: sometimes one of my tutors transfers to the other local university, but wants to continue working for me; sometimes they graduate and never leave (it seems); sometimes I hire from the community (people with bachelor degrees) - as it suits my needs.  I have one woman who has worked for me about 10 years. She just loves to tutor. I need another one like her who can do stats.

Hope some of that helps.

Kathryn Van Wagoner
Utah Valley University Math Lab
[log in to unmask]
801-863-8411



-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Shevawn Eaton
Sent: Friday, August 19, 2011 1:21 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Tutoring Upper Division Courses

Greetings everyone, I"m hoping you can assist me with your thoughts.  

My new boss has told me more than once in the last couple of weeks that we should start to focus our energies on tutoring upper division (eg courses in the major).  

We have never set out to do upper division.  It has always been policy here that we only support General education courses and core requirements.  As a result, we are entirely an undergraduate student tutor supported program.  

So here is my question for the four year university folks out there.....

If your services are NOT part of the academic college or department, but are a campus wide service, and you tutor upper division courses, how do you do that?

Do you use upper division students?  Graduate students?  Professional tutors?  

Do you use generalist tutors, working on the basic study strategies, etc, or do you have content based tutors that work that way.  

Do you work directly with faculty who teach these courses to be sure the tutoring provided is on target?

Do you know what proportion of the tutoring you do is for major courses?  What proportions of funds?

Anything else I should know?  Any advice?  Any suggestions?  Any warnings?  

I'm really at a loss on this.  I never thought we would be at this point, but demographic shifts in the student population have created new issues.  

Please feel free to give me a call or email me privately on the email below.  

Thanks for your help.



Shevawn Eaton, Ph.D.
Director, ACCESS/ESP
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, IL 60115
PH: (815) 753-0581
www.tutoring.niu.edu
[log in to unmask]

FAX: (815) 753-4115

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