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***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org ***** David Gibson might be a good place to start. He received some press back in 2003 for his research looking at social interactions in large social gatherings: http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/02/magazine/popular-mechanics.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

His 2005 AJS article examined how network relationships altered conversational patterns:

Gibson, David R. 2005. "Taking Turns and Talking Ties: Network Structure and Conversational Sequences." American Journal of Sociology 110(6):1561-97.



On Sat, Nov 26, 2011 at 4:51 PM, prisca benelli <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

Dear all,
My name is Prisca Benelli and I am a PhD candidate in International
Relations, focusing on forced migration and humanitarian assistance.

I am considering to do a research on the informal interactions of
humanitarian workers in a crisis context.
I want to see if the time spent together in bars after work has a
positive effect on the cooperation between different agencies.

I am thinking of exploring the interactions revolving around the
"bar*" run by the International Committee of the Red Cross in South
Sudan.

I am, however, new to social network analysis, and I am wondering if
you have any suggestion/idea on
a) relevant literature on similar topics (informal interactions,
possibly in bars, and work relationships);
b) recommendations, in general!

I would be very grateful for any lead and suggestion!

Thanks in advance,

Prisca Benelli



* Just for clarity, the ICRC does not run bars around the world. They
have, however, spaces opened to the humanitarian community in which
some of their employees volunteer and sell alchool, on a cost recovery
basis.

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--
Brian C. Keegan
Ph.D. Student - Media, Technology, & Society
School of Communication, Northwestern University

Science of Networks in Communities, Laboratory for Collaborative Technology
_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.