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Hi Jamie,

I believe Douglas White's (UC Irvine/Department of Anthropology) work might
be something you would want to add to the syllabus.

Best,
Lindsay

On Wed, Dec 21, 2011 at 5:35 PM, Amber Wutich <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Hi Jamie
>
> Jeff Johnson and Chris McCarty's syllabus is posted on
> http://qualquant.org/methodsmall/scrm/network/
>
> I only have one week on SN in my grad Ethnographic Field Methods class,
> but I use a few things that might be relevant:
>
> We read Trotter's piece in Schensul & LeCompte's 1999 Ethnogropher's
> Toolkit on Mapping Social Networks etc. It is quite accessible.
>
> Jeff Johnson and David Griffith have a nice new piece in Vaccaro, Smith,
> and Aswani's 2010 Environmental Social Sciences: Methods and Research
> Design.
>
> I always assign Schweizer, T. (1997) Embeddedness of Ethnographic Cases:
> A Social Networks Perspective. Current Anthropology. 38 (5): 739-760.
> Great, classic stuff.
>
> Hope that helps -
> Amber
>
> Amber Wutich, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor of Anthropology
> School of Human Evolution and Social Change
> Arizona State University
> http://shesc.asu.edu/wutich
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of James Holland Jones
> Sent: Monday, December 19, 2011 11:32 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Anthropology and Social Network Analysis
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Hi all,
>
> I am putting together a new course on social networks for the spring
> quarter and was curious to find out if anyone else had ever experimented
> with anthropology-heavy approaches to teaching SNA? I would be very
> interested in seeing other syllabi for SNA classes taught in an
> anthropological context. There are lots of anthropologists (or at least
> recovering anthropologists -- you know who you are!) in INSNA but, other
> than Alvin Wolfe's fine syllabus, I have not found much online
> specifically taking on anthropological approaches to social networks.
>
> The course that I am designing is fairly heavy on the classic Manchester
> social anthropologists (e.g., Barnes, Bott, Mitchell, Nadel) but also
> includes quite a bit of work coming out of the ethological tradition
> (e.g., Tinbergen, Hinde, Lorenz) -- I am a primatologist by training,
> after all. I would love to see what others have done, if anything.
>
> Thanks in advance...
>
> Cheers,
> Jamie
> --
> James Holland Jones
> Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology
> Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment
> Director, Methods of Analysis Program in the Social Sciences
>
> 450 Serra Mall
> Building 50
> Stanford, CA 94305-2034
>
> phone:  650-723-4824
> fax:    650-725-0605
> email:  [log in to unmask]
> url:    http://www.stanford.edu/~jhj1
>
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-- 
Lindsay Young
Doctoral Student
Northwestern University
Communication Studies
Media, Technology & Society Program

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