Print

Print


Hi all!

I just have one more comment to add to this string.  One of my biggest pet
peeves is the subject line of emails.  People need to make sure that it is
appropriately descriptive.  The worst offenders are those that don't put
anything in the subject line or put something that looks like a social word
(e.g. Greetings)  when it is professional subject related. I have re-sent
things to myself with a new subject line so that when I go to search for an
email on a subject, it will come up.  It makes it hard to scan emails if I
can't tell by the subject line what the email is about.

My two cents,

Joy

On Wed, Apr 11, 2012 at 8:20 AM, Brenda Tuberville <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> Shari:  I like the assignment idea; mind if I borrow??
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Shari Clevenger
> Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2012 7:11 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Is it important that students learn to compose proper emails?
>
> Dear Colleagues,
> I have experienced the same issue, so I now begin the semester with a
> graded assignment in which students send me an e-mail. I have two example
> e-mails on the assignment sheet to use as examples of how to send an e-mail
> with not only the needed information so I can respond to them, e.g. student
> full name and section number, but also a proper address to any
> instructor/professor/administrator or other individual: Dear Ms. Clevenger,
> Dear Professor Jones. Students are required to write complete sentences
> minus the text-speak. They do not receive points unless they meet all the
> criteria for the assignment. For the most part, student e-mails have
> greatly improved, although there are a few who don't quite understand it
> yet. Because I accept text messages from students, and after receiveing
> text messages from unknown students, the assignment has grown to include a
> proper text message. As the semester progresses, I think students finally
> understand how important this exercise is bec!
>  ause they get better results, e.g. responses from their instructors with
> the information students need.
>
> I think this is a very important life skill in that students develop the
> language needed to communicate with someone. I think this exercise also
> shows students that they need to show respect to the person they are
> e-mailing, and that it might possibly make a positive impression on their
> instructors. One thing for sure, I no longer see, "Hey," or "Clevenger," or
> even worse, the abbreviated form of my name, clevengs, that is part of my
> campus e-mail address.
>
> Shari
>
> Shari Clevenger
> Instructor/Coordinator Reading Enhancement Northeastern State University
> Seminary Hall 357
> 609 N. Grand Avenue
> Tahlequah, OK 74464
> [log in to unmask]
> 918-444-3607
>
> "Tomorrow's illiterate will not be the man who cannot read, he will be the
> man who has not learned how to learn." (Herbert Gerjuoy as quoted in Future
> Shock, 1970, p. 414)
>
>
> On Tue, Apr 10, 2012 at 5:21 PM, Linda Russell <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > I agree that students need to send emails that are clear. I like to
> > give my students the example of "hotmama@yahoo" who accused me of not
> > responding to her emails. Turns out Hotmama was in my spam folder, so
> > that is lesson #1: email me from your school account.
> >
> > Otherwise, anything that comes in without identification (my students'
> > school email is not their first and last names, so it's hard to tell)
> > gets the following reply from me: Who are you? What class are you in?
> >
> > Then the ball is in their court to write a clearer email. That doesn't
> > clean up the texting language, but at least I know to whom I am
> responding.
> > If I really can't figure it out, I just tell them to write me in
> > regular words...by this time, we probably have class, and their
> > question hasn't yet been addressed.
> >
> > I have a small collection of unreadable emails that I can use for
> > examples of how not to email me. I only use them when necessary!
> >
> > Good luck,
> > Linda Russell
> > Minneapolis Community and Technical College
> > ________________________________________
> > From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [
> > [log in to unmask]] on behalf of Martha Krupa
> > [[log in to unmask]]
> > Sent: Monday, April 02, 2012 8:20 AM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: Is it important that students learn to compose proper
> emails?
> >
> > Hi Michele,
> >
> >  It's a serious issue in my mind.  I have an e-mail protocol in my
> > syllabus and I do not respond to students who don't follow it.  I
> > teach more than one class at a time and we're often at different
> > places in the syllabus.  I certainly cannot tell what issue the
> > student is responding to without at the minimum a name instead of a
> > student number, the course section and what assignment or issue is in
> > question.  I have read many articles where issues of poor e-mail skills
> have affected the workplace.
> >  It's like anything else let run amuck; it becomes a bad habit.  I
> > don't think you're being a pain by holding them to a higher standard.
> > They may even thank you when they're out there working although I'm
> > sure we won't ever hear it aloud.
> >
> > Martha Krupa
> > Niagara University
> > Writing Coordinator
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
> > [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Michele Doney
> > Sent: Friday, March 30, 2012 11:06 AM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Is it important that students learn to compose proper emails?
> >
> > Hi all,
> >
> > I'm having one of those moments when I can't tell if I'm helping
> > prepare a student for the future, or just being a pain in the
> > backside.  Your input will be helpful.
> >
> > In the past few years, I've noticed that students have taken to
> > sending me emails that read as if they are texting their friends.
> > Often there is no salutation, no closing, and very little in the way
> > of punctuation or proper capitalization.  They make no attempt at
> > grammar, and they use the usual texting abbreviations for words they do
> not wish to spell out in full.
> >  Often, the student fails even to identify himself/herself, and when
> > the email address is something like [log in to unmask]," I can't
> > even work out how to address the student in my reply.  Do I start with
> > "Dear Bronx Hottie"?  Until recently, I ignored the style and
> > responded to the substance, if I could figure out what it was.
> > Lately, I have started to wonder if I am properly serving these
> > students by not seizing the opportunity to help them learn the
> > difference between texting their friends and writing to a member of
> > the college staff to request assistance. It has always been my
> philosophy that some of the !
> >  most important things a student learns in college are not necessarily
> > the things learned in the classroom.  With this in mind, I have
> > responded to a few students by letting them know I will be happy to
> > respond to their request if they are willing to compose a proper email.
> >
> > So tell me:  Am I prompting them to think and to develop an important
> > life skill, or am I just being a pain in the you-know-what?  Honestly,
> > I really can't tell!
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Michele
> >
> > MICHELE COSTABILE DONEY
> > DIRECTOR, MATH & SCIENCE RESOURCE CENTER NCLCA CERTIFIED LEARNING
> > CENTER PROFESSIONAL - LEVEL ONE OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES JOHN
> > JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINTAL JUSTICE
> > [Description: cid:3396506604_282853]
> > 524 W 59 ST
> > NEW YORK, NY 10019
> > T.646-557-4595
> > F.212.237.8742
> >
> >
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> > subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> > browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
> >
> > To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
> >
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> > subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> > browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
> >
> > To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
> >
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> > subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> > browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
> >
> > To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
> >
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
>
> To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> browser to
> http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
>
> To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
>



-- 
This email communication is confidential.  If you are not the intended
recipient, please do not read, copy, use, or disclose the contents of this
communication to others.  Please notify the sender that you have received
this email in error by replying to the email or by telephoning (608)
363-2572.  Please then delete the email and any copies of it.  Thank you.


Joy

Joy de Leon
Assistant Dean of Students
Director, Learning Enrichment and Disability Services
Beloit College
700 College Street
Beloit, WI 53511
(608) 363-2572 (office)
(608) 363-7059 (fax)
[log in to unmask]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]