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Dear Yves

I saw it in Worms too. Just assumed it had been done

Scott

On 10/2/12 11:11 PM, Yves Samyn wrote:
> RE: Fwd: Vicious Predators
>
> Hello Scott and Maria,
>
> Very interesting indeed.
>
> By the way, has the shift of P. californicus to Apostichopus been 
> formally published (I see it's in WoRMS), and if yes what's the reference?
>
> Enjoy your retirement Scott!
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Yves
>
>     -----Original message-----
>     *From:* Smiley Work <[log in to unmask]>
>     *Sent:* Wed 03-10-2012 05:27
>     *Subject:* Re: Fwd: Vicious Predators
>     *To:* [log in to unmask];
>     Dear Maria
>
>     The story here in Kodiak was that there were no Parastichopus
>     californicus (read Apostichopus californicus) in Kodiak when I was
>     first
>     here in 1974 due to their predation by King Crab (Paralithodes
>     camtschaticus) - and that the north-eastern biogeographical province
>     boundary for A. californicus at the end of the Kenai peninsula was
>     due
>     to the presence of  King Crabs - kind of neat thing - biogeographical
>     province boundaries set by predators. Turned out that the most common
>     item in King Crab stomachs in Kodiak during that era was echinoderm
>     parts, most common being vertebrae from ophiuroids! Now with this
>     info
>     on otters we have another predator to worry about - not to mention -
>     given the violent cycling of otter populations as they overgrow their
>     food base - the incredible dynamics of near shore communities over
>     the
>     time scale of a human life. PS. I managed to retire from the
>     University
>     of Alaska and am having a blast indulging all those fascinations I
>     set
>     aside when work deadlines loomed.
>
>     Scott
>
>
>     On 10/2/12 6:24 PM, [log in to unmask] wrote:
>     > Hi Scott
>     >
>     > I never wold have thought of that
>     >
>     > thanks
>     >
>     >
>     > Maria
>     >
>     > Quoting Smiley Work <[log in to unmask]>:
>     >
>     >> University of Alaska Fairbanks
>     >> Juneau Center, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences
>     >>
>     >> SEMINAR NOTICE
>     >>
>     >> Impacts of sea otter predation on commercially important sea
>     >> cucumbers (Parastichopus californicus) in Southeast Alaska
>     >>
>     >>
>     >> Sean Larson
>     >> MS Fisheries Candidate
>     >> Juneau Center, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences
>     >> Advisor: Dr. Ginny Eckert
>     >>
>     >> Friday, October 5, 2012
>     >> 9:00 a.m.
>     >>
>     >> Presenter - Juneau -UAF Lena Point Fisheries Building, room 101
>     >> Fairbanks - O'Neill, Room 214
>     >> Kodiak - Owen, Room 219
>     >>
>     >>
>     >>
>     >>
>     >> Abstract
>     >> Sea cucumbers (/Parastichopus californicus/), which are an
>     important
>     >> commercial, subsistence and ecological resource, are negatively
>     >> impacted by an expanding sea otter (/Enhydra lutris/)
>     population in
>     >> Southeast Alaska.  Sea otters were reintroduced into Southeast
>     Alaska
>     >> in the 1960s after their demise in the 18th and 19th century fur
>     >> trade; in the ensuing decades, the otter population grew, and sea
>     >> cucumber biomass declined.  This study evaluates the
>     interaction and
>     >> impacts of sea otters on sea cucumbers using sea cucumber foraging
>     >> observations and survey data and sea cucumber density data
>     collected
>     >> for fishery management.  Sea cucumbers represented about 5% of the
>     >> sea otter diet.  Declines in sea cucumber density ranged from
>     26 to
>     >> 100% in areas with sea otters and were most severe within areas
>     with
>     >> high sea otter use.  Sea cucumber density was lower in areas sea
>     >> otters inhabited longer.  The impact of sea otters should be
>     included
>     >> in sea cucumber fishery management as a step toward ecosystem
>     based
>     >> management and to ensure resource viability over the long term.
>     >>
>     >>
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     > Dr Maria Byrne
>     > Professor Marine and Developmental Biology
>     > Deputy Director One Tree Island Research Station
>     > Schools of Medical and Biological Sciences
>     > University of Sydney
>     > pH 61-2-9351-5167
>     > FAX 61-2-9351-2813
>     > [log in to unmask]
>     >
>     http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/anatomy/research/labs/byrne/projects/index.php
>
>     >
>     >
>     >
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