Print

Print


*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

Ian:

The earliest empirical name generator work I'm aware of is Coleman and
Katz's diffusion study:

Coleman, James, Elihu Katz, and Herbert Menzel. "The diffusion of an
innovation among physicians." *Sociometry* 20, no. 4 (1957): 253-270.

Coleman talked more generally about it later:
Coleman, James S. "Relational analysis: the study of social organizations
with survey methods." *Human Organization* 17, no. 4 (1958): 28-36.

Jim




On Tue, May 14, 2013 at 5:40 AM, Ian McCulloh <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
> Hi all,
>
> I need to justify the use of a name generator as a valid social science
> instrument.  I understand this is an odd request.  Can you provide me a few
> foundational papers describing the technique and maybe a couple applied
> papers?  I am not familiar with the origins of the method.  I'm hoping to
> find the paper where name generators were first proposed and a paper or two
> in a highly regarded journal.  Thanks in advance for assistance.
>
> Ian McCulloh, PhD
>
> On May 14, 2013, at 5:54 AM, Martin Everett <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>
> Hi all****
>
> I was recently asked the following and said I was not sure but would
> circulate. Please reply to Alberto Zanni [[log in to unmask]]****
>
> Thanks for you help****
>
> ** **
>
> Our name generator (part of an online survey with 2,000+ respondents)
> produced an average of about 7 close contacts per respondents (including
> people living with the respondents) and we wonder whether there are any
> recent (or fairly recent) studies reporting the average size of personal
> networks in the UK to compare with. It appears that similar studies in
> other European have produced much larger personal networks and for this
> reason our survey has been criticised for not giving a precise account of
> personal networks in the UK.    ****
>
> ** **
>
> Our name generator question was: *Please now consider the people (above
> 14 years of age) who are part of your social circle. In order to identify
> them, please consider those people who you have regular contact with,
> and/or who are the most important to you, and/or who you would want help to
> discuss personal matters, and/or who you can trust, and/or those you really
> enjoy socialising with.*
>
> ** **
>
> Martin Everett****
>
> Mitchell Centre for Social Network Analysis ****
>
> School of Social Sciences****
>
> Arthur Lewis Building****
>
> University of Manchester****
>
> Bridgeford Street****
>
> Manchester M13 9PL****
>
>  ****
>
> tel +44 (0)161 275 2515****
>
> ** **
>  _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email
> message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET
> in the body of the message.
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email
> message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET
> in the body of the message.
>



-- 
James Murphy
Ph.D. Student
Department of Sociology
The University of Chicago

E-mail: [log in to unmask]

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.