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Nice Jamie,

Also interesting to see what happens when you put the "s" on social 
networks -- a small semantic difference that tilts towards the SNA world.

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=social+network%2Csociogram%2Csociometric%2Csocial+networks&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=0&share=

best,
Martina

On Wed, 19 Jun 2013, James Holland Jones wrote:

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>
> This is very cool Michał -- it really puts the odd term "social graph" into perspective. Riffing on a theme a bit, it's interesting to note the changing terms in the field. Here, I add the terms "sociogram" and "sociometric". We can see that these two terms had their day mid-century (which was a time when every work on animal behavior would include a sociogram -- not so any more).
>
> http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=social+network%2Csocial+graph%2Csociogram%2Csociometric&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=0&share=
>
> If I understand my social networks history correctly, wasn't it Manchester School folks like John Barnes who started using the term "network" more regularly when talking about aggregates of social relations?
>
> Cheers,
> Jamie
>
> --
> James Holland Jones
> Associate Professor of Anthropology &
> Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment
>
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>
> On Jun 19, 2013, at 7:41 AM, Michał Bojanowski wrote:
>
>> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>>
>> All,
>>
>> While I think discussions about lexical definitions and about "size"
>> are usually not very interesting, I do think that the Wikipedia page
>> on "Social graph" is really peculiar:
>>
>> - It seems that "social graph" is nothing else but the name of the
>> network dataset assembled by Facebook to run its services. As such, to
>> me the term "social graph" is to "social network" in the same way like
>> "FarmVille" to "Agriculture".
>>
>> - The claim that "social graph" was first used by Philippe Bouzaglou
>> in 2002 (in some unidentified paper) sounds ridiculous. On Wikipedia
>> there is no link to that paper and I was not able to find it myself. I
>> think the main policy of Wikipedia is that it should contain
>> information and facts *documented* in concrete sources. I think this
>> is not case here.
>>
>> I like David's the idea of using ngrams. Its informative to have a
>> look at a chart comparing "social network" to "social graph". You can
>> use the link below.
>>
>> http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=social+network%2Csocial+graph&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=0&share=
>>
>> Best,
>> Michal
>>
>> On Wed, Jun 19, 2013 at 10:48 AM, David Lockhart
>> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>>> Bruno - I had the same reaction.  On a bit further thought, I wonder if he
>>> may be referring to some of the NSA's datasets, however you may have trouble
>>> getting access to them.
>>>
>>> I also have been feeling that the reactions to the statements about facebook
>>> popularizing the term social graph is overblown.  In fact, I had hoped - my
>>> eyes having prematurely saccaded to phrases such as "16th century" and
>>> "Francis Bacon" that the phrase "Of course, you all know that" was going to
>>> be followed by some data on the actual early uses of the term "social
>>> graph".  Not seeing such a thing, I looked it up in google ngrams, which
>>> finds the first use in 1922, with spikes in frequency every 10-15 years from
>>> 1950 to 2000. In fact, I was initially surprised that the degree of the
>>> spikes seem to be going down over time.  However, after a little thought, I
>>> suspect this is an artifact of G Ngrams displaying only a percentage of the
>>> corpus with hits. So I think the reason there are spikes is because there
>>> are 2 books per year instead of 1 that use the word combined with the
>>> continually increasing number of books published each year.  With only 1-3
>>> hits per year up to 2000, it is not at all hard to regard that a statement
>>> that "popularization" occurred in 2007 in spite of fairly extensive
>>> noncommercial use prior to that. People just weren't using it in books or
>>> putting those books in ngram. Identifying a point of "popularization" is a
>>> bit challenging, and I am not sure that measuring periodiical's frequency of
>>> usage is the best way to move forward.  But it's hard to deny that the term
>>> sees much greater use than once or twice a year and enough use to remain
>>> active.
>>> Ciao,
>>> David
>>>
>>>
>>> On Wed, Jun 19, 2013 at 12:53 AM, Bruno Goncalves <[log in to unmask]>
>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>>>> Hi,
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> At this stage I have neither the temperament, forbearance or the
>>>>> intestinal fortitude to correct claims like this one in Wikipedia:
>>>>>
>>>>>        "Facebook's social graph is the largest social network dataset in
>>>>> the   world." - Wikipedia
>>>>
>>>> I would be interested in knowing where I can find a larger dataset. Can
>>>> you point me to it?
>>>>
>>>> Best,
>>>>
>>>> Bruno
>>>>
>>>> *******************************************
>>>> Bruno Miguel Tavares Gonçalves, PhD
>>>> Homepage: www.bgoncalves.com
>>>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>>>> *******************************************
>>>>
>>>>
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