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Dear Phillip and SOCNET community,

	unfortunately we don't need to go back to the 60's
to find governments monitoring social movements. Here's a
more recent story:

http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/Government_Surveillance_of_Occupy_Movement

Ciao,

Matteo

On 06/21/2013 06:32 PM, Phillip Bonacich wrote:
> Hi Moses,
>
>              Over the past 50 years social scientists have developed
> sophisticated techniques for analyzing social networks.  Now these
> techniques are being used to fight a global war on terrorists.  We don’t
> own the techniques we developed but I think we can profitably reflect on
> the ways in which these techniques are used and the ways in which they
> might be used but aren’t.  For example, the resources devoted to the war
> on terror could be used to root out insider trading, a possibility which
> sends chills of pleasure down my spine.  On the other hand, in the 60’s
> they would certainly have been used against the civil rights and
> anti-war movements.
>
> *From:*Moses Boudourides [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> *Sent:* Friday, June 21, 2013 8:58 AM
> *To:* Phillip Bonacich; Social Networks Discussion Forum
> *Subject:* Re: puzzling omissions
>
> Hi Phil,
>
> Is there any known example of a case where NSA or anybody else has
> directly misappropriated data or analyses used in a journal publication
> of a social networks scholar and without the latter's consent or
> authorization? Or are we just speculating about possibilities and
> potential risks? Living outside the US I'm not familiar with what is
> really at stake in this debate and thus I'm asking.
>
> Best,
>
> --Moses
>
> On Fri, Jun 21, 2013 at 6:22 PM, Phillip Bonacich <[log in to unmask]
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>
> Hi.  Let me suggest another explanation for the silence.  There have
> been newspaper articles recently on the increasing collaboration between
> major Silicon Valley firms (Google, Facebook, etc.) and the NSA.
> Silicon Valley has the tools, talent, and data that the intelligence
> community wants.  To a much lesser extent, this relationship also holds
> for the social network community.  I, and probably others, am critical
> of massive intelligence gathering but I also know the intellectual and
> career pressures that would lead one to collaborate: that’s where the
> action is.   But, the moral dilemma is uniquely ours, and we could
> politely and publically debate the issues.  A debate might help all of
> us achieve some clarity on this murky subject.  Or, you might think of
> it as an experiment in network dynamics.  The outcome could be greater
> consensus or greater polarization.
>
> Phillip Bonacich
>
> Professor Emeritus
>
> Department of Sociology
>
> U.C.L.A.
>
> *From:*Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>] *On Behalf Of *James Moody
> *Sent:* Friday, June 21, 2013 5:40 AM
> *To:* [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> *Subject:* Re: puzzling omissions
>
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>
> He –
>
> Perhaps part of the silence is because the most interesting questions
> raised are not particularly network-specific (who owns data, what is the
> balance of govt protection vs. individual privacy, etc.), while the
> network-analytic issues are not particularly interesting (all the
> descriptions suggest that they are just building a big edgelist & doing
> a k-step breath-first-search from target nodes).
>
> On the former, the issues are deep moral & political questions –
> important and interesting, but not particularly network-centric.
>   Perhaps the one unique advantage folks on this list have to contribute
> to that is probably that most of the public severely over-estimates the
> computational ease of any real-time monitoring (rather than just data
> aggregation/collection). We could, perhaps, do a public service by
> making that more clear.
>
> On the latter, I think the technically interesting questions  here turn
> on how to store, organize & efficiently maintain a giant evolving
> edge-list, particularly when you care about people as nodes rather than
> the phone numbers as nodes.  That is, since numbers get changed &
> re-used and any nefarious near-do-well would certainly use multiple
> phones, a simple phone-number-is-node-number data storage system (which
> is inefficient in general, but fine for a BFS where all the isolates are
> ignored anyway) is not going to be particularly useful.  So you need a
> way to take each new batch of raw two-mode data (phone number – person)
> and sort, merge, match, etc. to your growing archive.   (the other
> obvious problem once you get into people-to-number merging on real data
> is the problem of false positives in name matching.  Again, great
> problem but not unique to networks).
>
> Peaceful Thoughts,
>
> Jim
>
> Professor Duke Sociology,
>
> Director, Duke Network Analysis Center
>
> *From:*Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> *On Behalf Of *Moses Boudourides
> *Sent:* Thursday, June 20, 2013 4:31 PM
> *To:* [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> *Subject:* Re: puzzling omissions
>
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>
> Wait a minute, folks, where's the PRISM-free social network analysis
> software? Tell me, Vlado, is Pajek safely PRISM-free?
>
> Cheers,
>
> --Moses
>
> On Jun 20, 2013 8:25 PM, "Michał Bojanowski" <[log in to unmask]
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>
> Bruce,
>
> Thanks! Thats an awesome compilation.
>
> ~michal
>
> On Jun 20, 2013 10:17 PM, "Bruce Cronin" <[log in to unmask]
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> http://prism-break.org/
>
>
>
> On 14 Jun 2013, at 14:10, "Barry Wellman" <[log in to unmask]
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>
>  > *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>  >
>  > I am flabbergasted that there has been no discussion on this list -- or
>  > even announcement -- of the NSA's use of social network analysis to do
>  > massive surveillance of American and unAmerican populations.
>  >
>  > Nor any talk of the Turkish situation -- seems to fit Chuck Tilly's
>  > network-basis analyses of collective political behaviour.
>  >
>  >   Barry Wellman
>  >  _______________________________________________________________________
>  >
>  >   S.D. Clark Professor               FRSC               NetLab Director
>  >   Faculty of Information (iSchool)                 611 Bissell Building
>  >   140 St. George St.    University of Toronto    Toronto Canada M5S 3G6
>  > http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman          twitter: @barrywellman
>  >
>  >   NETWORKED:The New Social Operating System. Lee Rainie & Barry Wellman
>  >   MIT Press http://amzn.to/zXZg39      Print $22  Kindle $16
>  >                  Old/NewCyberTimes http://bit.ly/c8N9V8
>  >
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