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This is very cool Michał -- it really puts the odd term "social graph" into perspective. Riffing on a theme a bit, it's interesting to note the changing terms in the field. Here, I add the terms "sociogram" and "sociometric". We can see that these two terms had their day mid-century (which was a time when every work on animal behavior would include a sociogram -- not so any more).

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=social+network%2Csocial+graph%2Csociogram%2Csociometric&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=0&share=

If I understand my social networks history correctly, wasn't it Manchester School folks like John Barnes who started using the term "network" more regularly when talking about aggregates of social relations?

Cheers,
Jamie

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James Holland Jones
Associate Professor of Anthropology &
Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment

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On Jun 19, 2013, at 7:41 AM, Michał Bojanowski wrote:

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> 
> All,
> 
> While I think discussions about lexical definitions and about "size"
> are usually not very interesting, I do think that the Wikipedia page
> on "Social graph" is really peculiar:
> 
> - It seems that "social graph" is nothing else but the name of the
> network dataset assembled by Facebook to run its services. As such, to
> me the term "social graph" is to "social network" in the same way like
> "FarmVille" to "Agriculture".
> 
> - The claim that "social graph" was first used by Philippe Bouzaglou
> in 2002 (in some unidentified paper) sounds ridiculous. On Wikipedia
> there is no link to that paper and I was not able to find it myself. I
> think the main policy of Wikipedia is that it should contain
> information and facts *documented* in concrete sources. I think this
> is not case here.
> 
> I like David's the idea of using ngrams. Its informative to have a
> look at a chart comparing "social network" to "social graph". You can
> use the link below.
> 
> http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=social+network%2Csocial+graph&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=0&share=
> 
> Best,
> Michal
> 
> On Wed, Jun 19, 2013 at 10:48 AM, David Lockhart
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>> Bruno - I had the same reaction.  On a bit further thought, I wonder if he
>> may be referring to some of the NSA's datasets, however you may have trouble
>> getting access to them.
>> 
>> I also have been feeling that the reactions to the statements about facebook
>> popularizing the term social graph is overblown.  In fact, I had hoped - my
>> eyes having prematurely saccaded to phrases such as "16th century" and
>> "Francis Bacon" that the phrase "Of course, you all know that" was going to
>> be followed by some data on the actual early uses of the term "social
>> graph".  Not seeing such a thing, I looked it up in google ngrams, which
>> finds the first use in 1922, with spikes in frequency every 10-15 years from
>> 1950 to 2000. In fact, I was initially surprised that the degree of the
>> spikes seem to be going down over time.  However, after a little thought, I
>> suspect this is an artifact of G Ngrams displaying only a percentage of the
>> corpus with hits. So I think the reason there are spikes is because there
>> are 2 books per year instead of 1 that use the word combined with the
>> continually increasing number of books published each year.  With only 1-3
>> hits per year up to 2000, it is not at all hard to regard that a statement
>> that "popularization" occurred in 2007 in spite of fairly extensive
>> noncommercial use prior to that. People just weren't using it in books or
>> putting those books in ngram. Identifying a point of "popularization" is a
>> bit challenging, and I am not sure that measuring periodiical's frequency of
>> usage is the best way to move forward.  But it's hard to deny that the term
>> sees much greater use than once or twice a year and enough use to remain
>> active.
>> Ciao,
>> David
>> 
>> 
>> On Wed, Jun 19, 2013 at 12:53 AM, Bruno Goncalves <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>> 
>>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>>> Hi,
>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> At this stage I have neither the temperament, forbearance or the
>>>> intestinal fortitude to correct claims like this one in Wikipedia:
>>>> 
>>>>        "Facebook's social graph is the largest social network dataset in
>>>> the   world." - Wikipedia
>>> 
>>> I would be interested in knowing where I can find a larger dataset. Can
>>> you point me to it?
>>> 
>>> Best,
>>> 
>>> Bruno
>>> 
>>> *******************************************
>>> Bruno Miguel Tavares Gonçalves, PhD
>>> Homepage: www.bgoncalves.com
>>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>>> *******************************************
>>> 
>>> 
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