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Agreed.

As a mere consumer of this list (1st msg - hi all) i wished that thread to pick momentum as well.

I personally find more interesting and useful to engage on issues that have impact on shaping the future to come. 

That said, i ack that consumers like us have their implicit share of guilt for not engaging that one wellman's msg, and i thank andrew for bringin this up.

Just my 2 cents
Ciao

"Andrew J. Enterline" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
>howdy,
>
>i am a political scientist and merely a consumer of the SOCNET 
>discussions, which i enjoy and learn from. over the past week, i was 
>struck by lack of response to barry wellman's post regarding the
>absence 
>of a discussion about the recent revelations concerning the NSA 
>("puzzling omissions," 6/14). indeed, this dearth was thrown into even 
>greater relief by the impressive buzz regarding attribution for 
>achievements in network analysis and the veracity of information on 
>wikipedia.
>
>while most of us are rarely trained in the normative and ethical 
>implications of our pursuit of normal science, it seems to me that 
>pondering the social, political, and economic ethical implications of 
>the science we do is an important exercise, even if it is difficult and
>
>often inconclusive. political science certainly has a long history
>(even 
>preceding its modern incarnation) rife with examples of theories not 
>used for "good", or well-intentioned efforts to implement theories for 
>the good that go awry. the post-WWII qualms of hard scientists
>wrestling 
>with the implications of their creations is also notable, and helped 
>motivate the field of peace science. yet, even peace science is cut 
>through with a normative tension: if one is a peace scientist, can one 
>do research demonstrating how to win wars that may in turn be used by 
>governments?
>
>i simply wonder what scientists of social networks think about these 
>normative issues in their general form, rather than as an indictment of
>
>a specific government policy, the NSA, and so forth.  perhaps it is 
>simply better to address the negative implications of network analysis 
>in fora other than science (e.g., politics), to forge ahead confident 
>that when the chips fall where they may, good outcomes will exceed the
>bad?
>
>regards,
>andrew
>
>On 6/14/2013 8:09 AM, Barry Wellman wrote:
>> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>>
>> I am flabbergasted that there has been no discussion on this list -- 
>> or even announcement -- of the NSA's use of social network analysis
>to 
>> do massive surveillance of American and unAmerican populations.
>>
>> Nor any talk of the Turkish situation -- seems to fit Chuck Tilly's 
>> network-basis analyses of collective political behaviour.
>>
>>   Barry Wellman
>> 
>_______________________________________________________________________
>>
>>   S.D. Clark Professor               FRSC               NetLab
>Director
>>   Faculty of Information (iSchool)                 611 Bissell
>Building
>>   140 St. George St.    University of Toronto    Toronto Canada M5S
>3G6
>>   http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman          twitter:
>@barrywellman
>>
>>   NETWORKED:The New Social Operating System. Lee Rainie & Barry
>Wellman
>>   MIT Press            http://amzn.to/zXZg39      Print $22 Kindle
>$16
>>                  Old/NewCyberTimes http://bit.ly/c8N9V8
>>
>________________________________________________________________________
>>
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-- 
Sent from my Android phone with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.

_____________________________________________________________________
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