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***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
I'm not a real expert in citation networks, but I did a little project of scientific communities, which was recently published in Social Networks  34 (2012) p, 215– 229 (as a note, I didn't use ERGM models, although I find them fascinating. This is for the comment on twitter that social networks only publishes ERGM. May I also point out that my previous article published in Social Networks was a qualitative study of 23 egonetworks. Again not exactly ERGM).

For that study, I did my homework, and read the literature about scientific communities and citation/co-authorships networks. It didn't take a Ph.d to notice immediately that there is a long tradition of studies starting for Diana Crane, Invisible Colleges, and build up through the work of Carley, Burt, Breiger, Batagelj, Lazega, just to name few. They also bridge the "boundaries" by referring to the main schools of sociology of science (not exactly network related), And there are also citations to the work of Barabasi (obviously, in the recent papers...), and Brandes (hey, that's computer science!).

Nice examples of this scientific tradition, that builds upon previous work no matter which discipline or school of thought comes from, are these two articles (only examples, not obviously exhaustive of the debate)
- Brian V. Carolan, The structure of educational research: The role of multivocality in promoting cohesion in an article interlock network, Social Networks 30 (2008) 69–82
- Clara Calero-Medina, Ed C.M. Noyons, Combining mapping and citation network analysis for a better
understanding of the scientific development: The case of the absorptive capacity field, Journal of Informetrics 2 (2008) 272–279

Note: they are both fairly recent, one is published in SN, the other elsewhere.

THEN I started reading articles like those:
Marco Tomassini, Leslie Luthi, Empirical analysis of the evolution of a scientific collaboration network, Physica A 385 (2007) 750–764
Mingyang Wanga, Guang Yua, Daren Yua, Effect of the age of papers on the preferential attachment in
citation networks, Physica A 388 (2009) 42734276

Note: they are both fairly recent, and they are both published in Physica A

Now you guys do your homework, and read the references of these last two articles. And then answer the question: who is building boundaries?

As a final note, I have to admit I have been a sin. I was annoyed by the last two, so I did not quote them in my paper. 
Apologies to the physicists.


Elisa Bellotti
Mitchell Centre for Social Network Anaslysis
University of Manchester
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Date: Sun, 16 Jun 2013 03:34:33 -0400
From: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [SOCNET] werent only the physicists
To: [log in to unmask]

***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org ***** I don't have any data on popularity, but two tilts at the windmill here:

1. Watts book six degrees was part of this popularity and it is half about human behavior.
2 the title six degrees resonated as it was embedded in the vulture ever since Milgram in the 1950s, boosted by the the John Guare play from the 1980s...turned into a film with Will smith.

So, as to the wider public, it is possible the interest in SNA was stoked by many non physicist influences. 

Jordi

On Saturday, June 15, 2013, "Gulyás, László" wrote:
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Dear Barry and All,

I think no one really questions that SNA existed before the arrival of the statistical physics approach to the field. Yet, it would be futile to question that it was the physicists' arrival that made it famous and known to the wider public (for better or worse).

Best regards,

-- Laszlo
--.--
GULYÁS, László Ph.D.
Head of Division
Intelligent Applications and Web Services
AITIA International, Inc.

2013.06.14. 21:53 keltezéssel, Barry Wellman írta:
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I just sent this comment to Science

Science 14 June 2013:
Vol. 340 no. 6138 pp. 1272-1272
DOI:10.1126/science.340.6138.1272

Network analysis blossomed well before the physicists came lately to the
field in the 1990s.  By the 1970s, social network analysis had a
professional society with 700 members and a lively annual conference in
the U.S. or Europe. Much good research, theorizing and methods were
done, resulting in the current NSA activity, for better or worse. The
key as you note, was the recent development of big data sets and
computational ability to analyze them.


   Barry Wellman
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excuse brevity and typing errors...the screen is very very small
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