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I can’t help but point out that the only cases that really fit the theory of structural balance were known in anthropology as “moiety  systems”: the tribe was divided into two halves, with the rule that people had to marry into the other half and that children belonged to the same half as their father in “patrilineal” moiety systems (or as their mother in the “matrilineal” kind). This implies that marriage is a negative relation. (No jokes allowed here.)

 

This brings up the question of how do you know if a relation R is positive or negative? One way is to look at its psychological properties, but another way is by its algebraic properties: positive ties are idempotent R^2=R, while negative ties are involutions: R^2R, but R^3=R.

 

From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of patrick doreian
Sent: Friday, August 16, 2013 7:56 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Negative Ties ...

 

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also of possible relevance on this topic:

Patrick Doreian, Paulette Lloyd and Andrej Mrvar (2013): “Fitting Large Signed Two-mode Blockmodels: Problems and Prospects”, Social Networks, 35: 178-203.



Andrej Mrvar and Patrick Doreian (2009), “Partitioning Signed Two-Mode Networks”, Journal of Mathematical Sociology, 33: 196-221.


. Patrick Doreian and Andrej Mrvar (2009) “Partitioning Signed Social Networks”, Social Networks, Vol. 31: 1-11.


On 8/15/2013 11:24 AM, Rich Persaud wrote:

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These may be relevant..

 

Rich

 

Ilany, Barocas, Koren, Kam, Geffen (2013) Structural balance in the social networks of a wild mammal. Animal Behaviour. 

http://www.nimbios.org/press/FS_hyrax

 

Srinivasan (2011), Local balancing influences global structure in social networks

http://www.pnas.org/content/108/5/1751.full



The friend of my enemy is my enemy: Virtual universe study of structural balance

Szell, Lambiotte, Thurner (2010). Multirelational organization of large-scale social networks in an online world. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100719162510.htm

http://www.pnas.org/content/107/31/13636.full.pdf

 

Leskovec, Huttenlocher, Kleinberg (2010), Predicting Positive and Negative Links in Online Social Media

http://www.cs.cornell.edu/home/kleinber/www10-signed.pdf

http://www.bcs.org/upload/pdf/jkleinberg-slides.pdf

 

Overview: Social Balance on Networks: The Dynamics of Friendship and Hatred

 

Brandes, Lerner (2008), Visualization of Conflict Networks

http://www.inf.uni-konstanz.de/algo/publications/bl-vcn-08.pdf



 

On Aug 15, 2013, at 10:30, Edmund Chattoe-Brown <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

 

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Dear All,

Although I am far from expert, it also struck me, reading:

Evans, K. M. (1962) Sociometry and Education, The International Library
of Sociology and Social Reconstruction (London: Routledge and Kegan
Paul).

that the routine collection of negative tie information seems to have
declined. For school children, I can see that there would be ethical
issues. (What do you do if you discover everyone hates Johnson?)

It is hard to see that these negative ties would not have significant
effects in real networks and thus that models not dealing with them
would be in some way inadequate.

All the best,

Edmund
--
 Edmund Chattoe-Brown (Department of Sociology, University of
 Leicester, UK)
 [log in to unmask]

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