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Hi:

I do have several references to these types of problems in the following:
Salem, P. J. (2013). The use of mixed methods in organizational
communication research. In M. C. Bocarnea, R. A. Reynolds, & J. D. Baker
(Eds.), Online instruments, data collection and electronic measurements:
Organizational advancements (pp. 24-39). Hersey, PA: IGI Global.

For the immediate situation, what kind of interview is this? Will you be
asking a lot of open-ended questions? Will you have more than one
interviewer per subject? Have you piloted the interview? How long will it
take?

My own experience is that qualitative interviews work best with a few
initial broad questions and a lot of time for follow up questions, some of
which might be on the interview guide for the interviewer. Also, the data
from such an interview typically saturate around 90-120 minutes.

Of course, there are interviews to elicit short answers that could just as
easily have been on a survey  sort of like a face-to-face name generator or
most "phone interviews".

Assuming any fatigue issues can be resolved with some piloting, my best
advice is to order the data gathering so that one informs the other. You may
discover you need to change interview questions or survey items/scales to
get the best data.

Phil Salem

From:  Ian McCulloh <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:  Ian McCulloh <[log in to unmask]>
Date:  Thursday, August 22, 2013 11:18 AM
To:  <[log in to unmask]>
Subject:  Data Collection Question

*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
I am designing a mixed methods data collection.  I want to conduct a survey,
free-list, and in-depth-interview of respondents.  What problems might exist
with doing these at the same time.  For example, I might embed free list
questions in a survey, or stop a survey and then do free-list, or do the
free-list first.  I might do a in-depth interview before or after the
survey.  I might use completely separate populations for each, however, that
will reduce my sample size.  I am concerned that the completion of a survey
might affect the free-list responses or vice-versa.
 
I would be interested in the communities thoughts on this issue as well as
any academic papers that have explored bias associated with this problem.
 
Thanks.
 
Ian
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