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Another old, strong tie is family. Family members may scatter to the four corners of the earth and have little to do with one another. Then a central, usually senior, member dies, and the clan reassembles for the funeral. The need to cooperate in disposing of legacies may bring brothers together, who usually have little to do with each other. Quarrels over inheritances may remind us of Simmel's observation that hostility is a social tie. 

While attending INSNA 2013 in Xi'an I was struck by the difference between the ideas of participants from Europe or the US and those from China. The former expounded theories grounded in the mathematics of random graphs, which ideologically speaking, coincide with market fundamentalism — autonomous actors bumping into each other and engaging in transactions. In contrast, when the Chinese talked about guanxi, they constantly made reference to pre-established ties created by kin or classmate relations and assumed that hierarchy and emotion are essential aspects of networks and not just outcomes of dyadic transactions.

John


On Wed, Aug 14, 2013 at 6:04 AM, Joe Labianca <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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Hi Valdis,

I'd look at Daniel Levin's work:
Levin, D. Z., Walter, J., & Murnighan, J. K. (2011).
Dormant Ties: The Value of Reconnecting.” Organization Science, 22(4), 923-939.

Levin, D. Z., Walter, J., & Murnighan, J. K. (2011).
The Power of Reconnection — How Dormant Ties Can Surprise You.” MIT Sloan Management Review, 52(3), 45-50.

Joe

Giuseppe (Joe) Labianca
Gatton Endowed Professor of Management
Gatton College of Business & Economics
LINKS Center for Social Network Analysis
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY 40506
859-257-3741 (office)
404-428-4878 (mobile)
 


On Tue, Aug 13, 2013 at 3:24 PM, Kenny Joseph <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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While not directly referring to the concept of an "old strong tie", Caroline Haythornthwaite provides the very useful concept of a latent tie.  If I recall correctly, the term is used to distinguish social ties that may develop when a new media is introduced into a social system.

Haythornthwaite, Caroline. 2002. “Strong, Weak, and Latent Ties and the Impact of New Media.” The Information Society 18 (5): 385=401.

Kenny Joseph
 


On Tue, Aug 13, 2013 at 3:15 PM, Valdis Krebs <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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John,

Yeah, for the first iTunes phone (ROKR), design by committee (across boundaries between Apple and  Motorola) probably included many weak ties.  After that failure, for the iPhone, Jobs went back to his strong ties, especially Jonathon Ive, to whom he trusted many key Apple designs.  Ive in turn had his own strong ties within team/company to execute the design.

The iPod was also designed by strong ties within Apple and outside of Apple... an "old strong tie" came to call on Apple -- "Hey, I have an idea."

Hey Academics... what is an "old strong tie"??? 

Old strong tie is where A and B worked together at Company X, but now A works at Company Y and B at Company Z (and naturally they interact less now) and they re-connect to collaborate (re-animating their prior tie) for a new product at Company Z.  Is an old strong tie, even an inactive/dormant strong tie, still a "strong tie"?  Or does it become a "weak tie" while in it's dormant phase???

Would love to hear many viewpoints on this!

Valdis Krebs



On Aug 13, 2013, at 2:34 PM, John T. Maloney wrote:

Apple rejected the "design by committee" approach that had yielded the Motorola ROKR E1, a largely unsuccessful collaboration with Motorola.


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