***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****

Great discussion!! Building on Stephen’s comments regarding tie multiplexity and tie evolution, my articles on the typology of relational embeddedness (Hite, 2003, 2005, 2008) identify different types of relational embeddedness.  This typology expands our notions of strong ties and also suggests that some types of relationally embedded ties may have previously been identified as weak ties.  This typology helps to move us from a dichotomous view of weak/strong ties and explores the continuum in between, enabling a broader range of identification of types of ties.

 

The typology suggests that ties can have high extents of personal relationship, social capital and dyadic interaction – or any one or combination of these three social components (aligned with affect, reciprocity and frequency).  Ties with all three social components reflect “full embeddedness,” governed by three different types of trust.  However, ties with a high degree of only one of these social components can still be relationally embedded (affecting decision making; maintaining relationship over economic decision making, using trust-based governance, resource accessibility, etc.).  Many of these ties with only one type of social component may often be identified as weak ties in research based on the dichotomy of weak/strong ties.

 

One type of relationally embeddedness that the typology identifies is “latent embeddedness” in which ties have a high extent of personal relationship and social capital, but do not have a high extent of dyadic interaction.  These ties may be overlooked in network research, particularly work- or organizational-based networks, as there may not currently be direct network content flowing (due to low interaction or frequency); they may also be labeled as weak ties in one given network context (relation) while being strong ties in another network context (relation).   

 

Yet, given the multi-dimensionality (e.g. multiplexity) and evolutionary (transient) nature of ties, these latent ties can often be activated quickly based on their high degree of personal relationship and social capital.  Thus, what may appear to be a weak (or absent) tie in one network relation may actually also have characteristics of a strong tie in another relation.   Without accounting for the multiplexity of network relations, and the multiple dimensions of relational embeddedness (strong ties), the weak/strong tie research may be missing critical components of the nature, content and structure of ties.

 

Hite, Julie M. (2003). Patterns of multi-dimensionality among embedded network ties: A typology of relational embeddedness in emerging entrepreneurial firms. Strategic Organization, 1(1), 9-49.

 

Hite, Julie M. (2005). Evolutionary processes and paths of relationally-embedded network ties in emerging entrepreneurial firms. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 29, 113-144.

 

Hite, Julie M. (2008). The role of dyadic multi-dimensionality in the evolution of strategic network ties. In J. A. C. Baum & T. J. Rowley (Eds.), Advances in Strategic Management: Network Strategy (Vol. 25, pp. 133-170). Oxford UK: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Julie M. Hite

Brigham Young University

Educational Leadership & Foundations

801-422-5039  (voice mail comes to my email)

[log in to unmask]

 

From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Pryke, Stephen
Sent: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 5:47 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: What is an old/dormant strong tie?

 

***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****

Some interesting discussion about tie strength and we have been giving this some thought to tie strength in the context of project based organisations here at UCL.  My view is that tie strength is transient and not necessarily reciprocal.  I have difficulty with the notion that family is a strong tie, any more than marriage or other forms of contracts create strong ties.  In fact tie strength, like beauty, is ‘in the eye of the beholder’.  We all have our own value systems that we apply to tie strength measurement.

 

My father, as part of his business activity, called at an address in London one day; a man of approximately the same age answered the door;  during the brief conversation that ensued the two men established that they were brothers.  They had made no contact for 30-40 years.  Once their business was completed they shook hands and wished each other well.  And never saw each other again!  Nothing malicious here; no dispute over inheritances.  Just a very weak tie!!  [large family; very wide age range amongst siblings; lots of relocation caused by WW2; natural tendency not to maintain family ties etc]

 

So I think as academics we need to do a lot more work on tie strength; it is transient and therefore needing maintenance; related to actor characteristics and the environment in which the networks function; it is also possible to have several different tie strengths present between actors concurrently, based on  a variety of network functions.

 

Thoughts of others welcome

 

 

Stephen

UCL

 

 

 

From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of John McCreery
Sent: 14 August 2013 00:37
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: What is an old/dormant strong tie?

 

***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****

Another old, strong tie is family. Family members may scatter to the four corners of the earth and have little to do with one another. Then a central, usually senior, member dies, and the clan reassembles for the funeral. The need to cooperate in disposing of legacies may bring brothers together, who usually have little to do with each other. Quarrels over inheritances may remind us of Simmel's observation that hostility is a social tie. 

 

While attending INSNA 2013 in Xi'an I was struck by the difference between the ideas of participants from Europe or the US and those from China. The former expounded theories grounded in the mathematics of random graphs, which ideologically speaking, coincide with market fundamentalism — autonomous actors bumping into each other and engaging in transactions. In contrast, when the Chinese talked about guanxi, they constantly made reference to pre-established ties created by kin or classmate relations and assumed that hierarchy and emotion are essential aspects of networks and not just outcomes of dyadic transactions.

 

John

 

On Wed, Aug 14, 2013 at 6:04 AM, Joe Labianca <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****

Hi Valdis,

I'd look at Daniel Levin's work:
Levin, D. Z., Walter, J., & Murnighan, J. K. (2011).
Dormant Ties: The Value of Reconnecting.” Organization Science, 22(4), 923-939.

Levin, D. Z., Walter, J., & Murnighan, J. K. (2011).
The Power of Reconnection — How Dormant Ties Can Surprise You.” MIT Sloan Management Review, 52(3), 45-50.

Joe


Giuseppe (Joe) Labianca

Gatton Endowed Professor of Management

Gatton College of Business & Economics

LINKS Center for Social Network Analysis

University of Kentucky

Lexington, KY 40506

859-257-3741 (office)

404-428-4878 (mobile)

 

 

On Tue, Aug 13, 2013 at 3:24 PM, Kenny Joseph <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****

While not directly referring to the concept of an "old strong tie", Caroline Haythornthwaite provides the very useful concept of a latent tie.  If I recall correctly, the term is used to distinguish social ties that may develop when a new media is introduced into a social system.

 

Haythornthwaite, Caroline. 2002. “Strong, Weak, and Latent Ties and the Impact of New Media.” The Information Society 18 (5): 385=401.


Kenny Joseph

 

 

On Tue, Aug 13, 2013 at 3:15 PM, Valdis Krebs <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****

 

John,

 

Yeah, for the first iTunes phone (ROKR), design by committee (across boundaries between Apple and  Motorola) probably included many weak ties.  After that failure, for the iPhone, Jobs went back to his strong ties, especially Jonathon Ive, to whom he trusted many key Apple designs.  Ive in turn had his own strong ties within team/company to execute the design.

 

The iPod was also designed by strong ties within Apple and outside of Apple... an "old strong tie" came to call on Apple -- "Hey, I have an idea."

 

Hey Academics... what is an "old strong tie"??? 

 

Old strong tie is where A and B worked together at Company X, but now A works at Company Y and B at Company Z (and naturally they interact less now) and they re-connect to collaborate (re-animating their prior tie) for a new product at Company Z.  Is an old strong tie, even an inactive/dormant strong tie, still a "strong tie"?  Or does it become a "weak tie" while in it's dormant phase???

 

Would love to hear many viewpoints on this!

 

Valdis Krebs

 

 

 

On Aug 13, 2013, at 2:34 PM, John T. Maloney wrote:

 

Apple rejected the "design by committee" approach that had yielded the Motorola ROKR E1, a largely unsuccessful collaboration with Motorola.

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.

 

_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.

 

_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.



 

--
John McCreery
The Word Works, Ltd., Yokohama, JAPAN
Tel. +81-45-314-9324
[log in to unmask]
http://www.wordworks.jp/

_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.

_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.

_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.