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A couple of years ago I was talking to a political science professor about
districting, and he said that in districts that are a majority Democrat,
they tend to be quite strongly Democrat (I think he said they tend to be 70
to 80 percent Democrat), while Republicans tend to only hold their
districts with a 55 to 65 percent majority.  I could be completely wrong on
those numbers, though, I haven't looked at any data, and the conversation
was a long time ago.

Thinking on these lines, I would suggest that this is not a bounded
network, but a multi-level network.  It isn't just about influence within
Congress as a building, it is about controlling voting behavior within
Districts.  If even 10 percent of a district is Tea Partiers who will not
vote for a moderate, then a moderate Republican would have to do whatever
it takes to appeal to them, including vote down a budget.

Just some early morning thoughts before my cup of coffee though.  I may
change my mind in twenty minutes.

Best Regards,

Eric DesMarais, MSW, LCSW
Project Assistant to the Dean's Office
Doctoral Candidate
Graduate School of Social Work
University of Denver
2148 South High Street
Denver, CO 80208
303.871.4253


On Wed, Oct 2, 2013 at 8:57 PM, Valdis Krebs <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Looking at the current US government shutdown... it "appears" that a small
> group of far-right politicians (a minority in their own Republican Party)
> have sway over the rest of the party (many of whom do not want the
> shutdown), but out of fear(apparently) all Republicans are
> supporting/voting the minority view.
>
> Can a smart sociologist explain what is going on?  Have any SNA studies
> been done on how a small minority(~10%) controls a majority in a bounded
> network? Any good papers on fear in networks?
>
> Valdis Krebs
> http://orgnet.com
> http://thenetworkthinkers.com
>
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