Print

Print


Jered and Marcia,

Yes, you're right.  My approach doesn't answer the question about motivation or even self-selection for that matter. It does, however, show that academic support can help the less proficient student. My take on the difference between the two has more to do with the goal of academic support: Is it to motivate students or help them achieve academic success? I think it's the latter.

I'm not sold on the idea that personality-inventory-type assessments such as the MSLQ will help to answer the age-old question regarding motivation and self-selection. Creating a baseline score for participants/non-participants is akin to chasing a ghost; there are so many variables to consider when you're talking about students, particularly first-year students who first need to learn how to learn. Much of this initial process is learning to self-regulate, ask for help, manage time....

Students who fail will often say, in one way or another, if we know something is "good" for them, why don't we make them do it. Though, forcing students to attend tutoring or SI raises the argument regarding prescriptive vs optional. Give students the option to work with a tutor and they will opt out. Make students work with a tutor and they're not only resentful but resistant to any help the tutor tries to offer. 

sal

Sara Weertz, M.Ed.
Executive Director, First Year Experience 
ASU Station #10915
Angelo State University
San Angelo, TX  76909
(325) 942-2595
[log in to unmask]

CRLA President-Elect 2013-2014
www.crla.net


**********************************************************

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Jered Wasburn-Moses
Sent: Thursday, January 09, 2014 9:34 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: ROI on Academic Support Services? -- Different Take

This is a great approach, Sara, but I am not sure that it addresses the core issue raised by Marcia. After all, of all the data you cite below, which of them is supposed to serve as a proxy measure for personal motivation or stick-to-it-ive-ness or gumption or whatever? Because attendance rate at tutoring (including SI) is, at least in part, a proxy measure of such traits/skills. 

The difficult question remains, how much of the effect from ANY "opt-in" intervention is due to the intervention itself, and how much is due to the proxy measurement of certain psychological traits captured by the act (and rate) of opting in?

I believe that I have seen some people (maybe even you?) try to address this in the past using personality-inventory-type assessments. This might work, if you had a baseline score for non-participants as well as participants...

Jered Wasburn-Moses
Math Center Coordinator
Success Skills Coordinator
Learning Assistance Programs
Northern Kentucky University
http://lap.nku.edu
University Center 170F
(859) 572-5779


# -----Original Message-----
# From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:LRNASST- # [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Sara Weertz # Sent: Thursday, January 09, 2014 10:15 AM # To: [log in to unmask] # Subject: Re: ROI on Academic Support Services? -- Different Take # # Ah, I love this question...one I think I can answer because this used to be a # typical response to Supplemental Instruction (SI) which has a history of # empirical evidence indicating that students who use SI on a regular basis get # better grades. Faculty often opine that SI students would have gotten # successful grades no matter what; they argue that SI students (or those who
# self-select) are already the "good" students.   Faculty continued their
# criticism of the numbers even after I added qualitative data--feedback from # the students themselves, in their own words, saying they excelled in their # coursework because of SI.
#
# It was, however, more difficult to be critical of my interpretive report, which # pulls the following data on students enrolled in SI-supported classes:
#
# * GPA (at the beginning of the term)
# * ACT/SAT scores
# * Classification
# * Ethnicity
# * Residency (on/off campus)
# * Major/Minor
# * Academic Standing
# * Cohort attributes such as athletics, provisional status, international student, # etc.
#
# If I run the interpretive reports at the beginning of the term, I get a bird's- # eye view of the class, which allows me to also create individual student # profiles.
#
# The beauty of the interpretive report is its use as a tool to make predictions # about the students in our SI-supported classes. An example would be to # examine how a freshman with several at-risk factors and low ACT scores # (which tests science acumen) might fare in a traditionally difficult biology # class. Since our SI support focuses on traditionally difficult classes where # many students struggle, we then make predictions on success (A, B, or C) # depending on whether the less proficient students and those considered at- # risk attend SI, how often they attend, and when they attend. The # interpretive report allows us to compile some fascinating reports for variety # of departments and student services. Our measurements consistently show # that no matter how many at-risk factors a student may have, the more SI # visits, the higher the final grade.
#
# While something like an interpretive report is more difficult to generate with # tutoring, it can be done.
#
# sal
#
#
# Sara Weertz, M.Ed.
# Executive Director, First Year Experience ASU Station #10915 Angelo State # University San Angelo, TX  76909 # (325) 942-2595 # [log in to unmask] # # CRLA President-Elect 2013-2014 # www.crla.net # # ****************************************************
#
#
# -----Original Message-----
# From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:LRNASST- # [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Marcia Toms # Sent: Thursday, January 09, 2014 8:32 AM # To: [log in to unmask] # Subject: Re: ROI on Academic Support Services? -- Different Take # # That is great, Leonard.
#
# One question, though: Do students voluntarily come to your center?  If so, # how do you address the motivation issue?  In other words, who is to say that # these students wouldn't have higher retention rates anyway?
#
# Best,
# -Marcia
#
#
# On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 9:06 AM, Roberta Schotka # <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
#
# > Leonard,
# >
# > That is brilliant, especially since it is so difficult to link grades # > directly to tutoring, given all of the other contributing factors.
# >
# > -Roberta
# >
# >
# > On Wed, Jan 8, 2014 at 4:52 PM, Geddes, Leonard G.
# > <[log in to unmask]
# > >wrote:
# >
# > > Melissa and any others who are interested, # > > # > > I have attached part of a report that I sent up to the "powers  that be"
# > > about the influence our services are having on the bottom line -- # > > retention. In the past, we communicated how we were affecting # > > academic performance.  However, when it seemed like reporting how # > > students were improving academically was not generating the traction # > > that we thought it deserved, I decided to speak the administration's # > > language by adding a retention element to the report.  In short, we # > > compared the re-enrollment rates of students using our services to # > > general student retention, # > athletic # > > teams, etc.  Our numbers rocked!  (I've attached an abbreviated # > > report since I don't think the administration would like us to share # > > financial info publically.) # > > # > > In the actual report, we put figures to the report by factoring in # > > the "real" revenue that is generated per student. For example, # > hypothetically, # > > if the overall retention rate was 70%, but our numbers were 86%, # > > then we showed numerically how much revenue 16% more students # added # > > to the bottom line, thus showing that we are revenue generating.
# > >
# > > As a result of changing to reporting this way, our reports have been # > going # > > all the way up the chain to the Board.  Recently, they specifically # > > referenced our center and services in the new strategic plan!  We # > > are now preparing for a significant budget increase as well -- yay!
# > >
# > > I hope this is useful.
# > >
# > > Leonard Geddes
# > > Associate Dean of Co-Curricular Programs Director of the Learning # > > Commons Division of Student Life Lenoir-Rhyne University www.lr.edu # > > [log in to unmask] # > > (828) 328-7024 # > > (828) 328-7702 (fax) # > > # > > The LearnWell Projects Blog:
# > http://www.thelearnwellprojects.com/thewell/
# > >
# > >
# >
# > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
# > To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your # > subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web # > browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
# >
# > To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask] # > # # # # -- # Marcia Toms, Ph.D.
# Associate Director
# Undergraduate Tutorial Center
# Division of Academic and Student Affairs North Carolina State University # Campus Box 7118 / 101 Park Shops Raleigh, NC 27695-7118 # 919.513.7829 # http://www.ncsu.edu/tutorial_center/
#
# Public Record Reminder: All electronic mail messages in connection with # State business that are sent to or received by this account are subject to the # NC Public Records Law.  They are retained and may be disclosed to third # parties.
#
# Confidentiality: Nothing in the NC Public Records Law diminishes the privacy # protections afforded by federal law (e.g., FERPA, HIPAA, etc.) # # ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ # To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your # subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web # browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
#
# To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask] # # ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ # To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your # subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web # browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
#
# To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]