Print

Print


I work with students on academic probation and those identified by test
scores as under-prepared and needing academic support. I use the proactive
(formerly intrusive) academic advising model and I see real academic
recovery, as demonstrated by significantly higher average GPAs, the number
of units/credits attempted, and the number of units/credits actually
completed. Proactive advising has great outcomes, but is incredibly
time-consuming. Whenever I find my energy flagging, or I'm feeling
overwhelmed by the needs of the many, I'm reminded of the many
inspirational true-life stories of educationally marginalized students in
Mike Rose's *Lives on the Boundary. *I tell myself that my intervention--my
investment in the student, if you will--may be the one act of encouragement
that keeps him or her engaged and coming back to class.

A college education does not always guarantee a better job, but it grants
greater access to work with a sustainable wage. The number of Bill Gates'
 who can drop out of college and form a successful company are the
exception, not the rule; I want to see an expansion of effective academic
support systems in colleges, not a lessening of such programs. Investing in
our students, especially those who are under-prepared because they come to
us from school systems that failed to ready them for the challenges of
college, is noble work that I am honored to shoulder. The real challenge is
determining what are the best interventions.


On Wed, Apr 9, 2014 at 11:04 AM, Aldrich,Charlene <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Why not place them into actual course rather than the prereq?
>
> I'm all for either if the student could take the final exam of any prereq
> and pass it.
>
> And I do want each and every person who steps foot on my campus to become
> everything that he/she was created to be.  I do and will continue to do
> everything it takes to support that student's work to that end.
>
> C
>
> Let your life speak.
>
>
> Charlene Aldrich, Instructor
> Academic Coordinator
> Palmer Campus
> Trident Technical College
> Charleston, SC  29412
> 843.722.5516
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Donna Kim Ballard
> Sent: Wednesday, April 09, 2014 10:30 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Phys.Org
>
> Well, because strategies exist that can help some students learn what they
> need to learn during the prereq course they may have seemed not qualified
> to take, and it's hard to really know if students aren't under-prepared for
> a course, despite the convenience of COMPASS and other simple but fairly
> ineffective placement tests. I guess the choice of allowing a student into
> a prereq depends on each individual student and what the definition of
> "underprepared" is and how that label/reality is determined.
>
> As long as college education = better job and being uplifted out of
> poverty or being able to continue to live at the level (or above) of one's
> parents or being able to reach a goal one has or being able to feel one is
> following a desired path, then many people will be willing to try to teach
> students. It's the time of the year for frustration, of course, but I think
> I'd let student's lives speak in complex enough ways to allow them to be
> given a good chance at success if they want to try, and my job may be
> helping them see what's involved in course/goal/college success. The rub is
> the "good chance" I'd hope students can hae often translates to
> under-budgeted and overworked instruction. So if we had world enough and
> time (and money) may be the real rub here, not the students necessarily.
> And then we're looking at economics, class, ability definitions and access,
> and other social issues . . . .
>
> Kim
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Charlene Aldrich" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Wednesday, April 9, 2014 10:14:45 AM
> Subject: Re: Phys.Org
>
> But why would you want to place a student in to the prereq course if they
> are underprepared for it?
>
> Let your life speak.
>
>
> Charlene Aldrich, Instructor
> Academic Coordinator
> Palmer Campus
> Trident Technical College
> Charleston, SC  29412
> 843.722.5516
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Larina Warnock
> Sent: Tuesday, April 08, 2014 12:55 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Phys.Org
>
> This is very interesting. I wonder what systemic forces might be at work
> at the four-year level and if there is any variation between departments.
> It seems that developmental coursework might keep someone out of a prereq
> during the term they need it, for example.
>
> Larina Warnock
> Developmental Studies Instructor
> WH214
> 541-917-2311
>
> We read to know we are not alone. -C.S. Lewis
>
>
> On Tue, Apr 8, 2014 at 9:28 AM, Nic Voge <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > Intriguing. This makes sense to me: "We need further investigation of
> > the ingredients for success at those colleges where taking
> > developmental coursework..."
> >
> > I think these courses should be conceptualized as preparatory
> > (prospective) more than remedial (retrospective) in focus. What do
> > receiving institutions expect of students seems to me to be a crucial
> > question with lots of different answers.
> > Nic
> > __________________________________
> > Dominic (Nic) J. Voge
> > [log in to unmask]
> > (609)258-6921
> > http://www.princeton.edu/mcgraw/us/
> >
> > Associate Director
> > McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning 328C Frist Campus Center
> > Princeton University Princeton, NJ 08544
> >
> > Individual Appointment Times:
> > By request
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Apr 8, 2014, at 11:06 AM, Norman Stahl wrote:
> >
> >  Remedial courses fail bachelor's degree seekers, but boost those in
> >> associate's programs
> >> April 7th, 2014 in Other Sciences / Social Sciences
> >>
> >>
> >> Taking remedial courses at the four-year college level may hold
> >> students back from earning their bachelor's degrees, but at the
> >> community college level remedial education can help earn an
> >> associate's degree, according to researchers from Boston College's
> Lynch School of Education.
> >> The role of remedial education has been under scrutiny for years,
> >> viewed as an essential tool in efforts to raise rates of degree
> >> completion. At the same time, critics question whether the courses
> >> are appropriate for institutions of higher education.
> >> The answer may not be so simple, according to Lynch School researcher
> >> Katherine A. Shields and Associate Professor of Education Laura M.
> >> O'Dwyer, who reviewed a federal database of interviews and academic
> >> transcript data from more than 10,000 students at 670 two- and
> four-year institutions.
> >> At four-year colleges, students who took three or more remedial
> >> courses struggled to attain a bachelor's degree when compared to
> >> similar peers who took no remedial courses, according to the
> >> researchers, who presented their findings today at the American
> >> Educational Research Association (AERA) annual meeting in Philadelphia.
> >> Among students at two-year colleges, taking developmental education
> >> courses was associated with better odds of earning an associate's
> >> degree but no higher within six years of enrollment, Shields and
> >> O'Dwyer discovered, drawing on data collected from college students
> >> between 2004 and 2009.
> >> When the researchers looked at the relationship of taking remedial
> >> courses to the chances of two-year college students ultimately
> >> earning a bachelor's degree, the potential benefits of the courses
> disappeared.
> >> Taking three or more remedial courses at the two-year college level
> >> was negatively associated with attaining a bachelor's degree, they
> found.
> >> Developmental education may divert them from transferring to complete
> >> a higher degree.
> >> In addition, the results of remedial courses varied from one two-year
> >> institution to another, which may reflect the diversity of new
> >> developmental course models arising during the period of the study,
> >> according to O'Dwyer, a specialist in educational research,
> >> measurement, and evaluation.
> >> Shields said the results show that remedial education at the two-year
> >> level is not a hindrance in the same way as it seems to be at the
> >> four-year level, but researchers need to delve into which types of
> >> programs are the most effective and why.
> >> "We need further investigation of the ingredients for success at
> >> those colleges where taking developmental coursework doesn't hold
> >> students back from finishing an associate's degree," Shields said.
> >> "Are there institutional policies that do a better job of matching
> >> students to courses? Are innovations in developmental curriculum
> >> paying off? The picture looks a lot more complex than in the four-year
> setting."
> >> More information: O'Dwyer and Shields will present their paper
> >> "College Completion and Remedial Education: Do Institutional
> >> Characteristics Make a Difference?" at 8:15 a.m. on Monday, April 7.
> >> For more information about the session, please see this link.
> >>
> >> Provided by Boston College
> >>
> >> "Remedial courses fail bachelor's degree seekers, but boost those in
> >> associate's programs." April 7th, 2014. http://phys.org/news/2014-04-
> >> remedial-courses-bachelor-degree-seekers.html
> >>
> >>
> >> Norman Stahl
> >> [log in to unmask]
> >>
> >>
> >> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >> To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> >> subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your
> >> web browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
> >>
> >> To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
> >>
> >
> >
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> > subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> > browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
> >
> > To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
> >
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
>
> To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> browser to
> http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
>
> To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> browser to
> http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
>
> To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> browser to
> http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
>
> To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
>



-- 
Christine Kath Ruggeri
Writing Center Director,
Assistant Director, Center for Academic and Career Engagement
718-420-4080

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]