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Intriguing. This makes sense to me: "We need further investigation of  
the ingredients for success at those colleges where taking  
developmental coursework..."

I think these courses should be conceptualized as preparatory  
(prospective) more than remedial (retrospective) in focus. What do  
receiving institutions expect of students seems to me to be a crucial  
question with lots of different answers.
Nic
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Dominic (Nic) J. Voge
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On Apr 8, 2014, at 11:06 AM, Norman Stahl wrote:

> Remedial courses fail bachelor's degree seekers, but boost those in  
> associate's programs
> April 7th, 2014 in Other Sciences / Social Sciences	
>
>
> Taking remedial courses at the four-year college level may hold  
> students back from earning their bachelor's degrees, but at the  
> community college level remedial education can help earn an  
> associate's degree, according to researchers from Boston College's  
> Lynch School of Education.
> The role of remedial education has been under scrutiny for years,  
> viewed as an essential tool in efforts to raise rates of degree  
> completion. At the same time, critics question whether the courses  
> are appropriate for institutions of higher education.
> The answer may not be so simple, according to Lynch School  
> researcher Katherine A. Shields and Associate Professor of Education  
> Laura M. O'Dwyer, who reviewed a federal database of interviews and  
> academic transcript data from more than 10,000 students at 670 two-  
> and four-year institutions.
> At four-year colleges, students who took three or more remedial  
> courses struggled to attain a bachelor's degree when compared to  
> similar peers who took no remedial courses, according to the  
> researchers, who presented their findings today at the American  
> Educational Research Association (AERA) annual meeting in  
> Philadelphia.
> Among students at two-year colleges, taking developmental education  
> courses was associated with better odds of earning an associate's  
> degree but no higher within six years of enrollment, Shields and  
> O'Dwyer discovered, drawing on data collected from college students  
> between 2004 and 2009.
> When the researchers looked at the relationship of taking remedial  
> courses to the chances of two-year college students ultimately  
> earning a bachelor's degree, the potential benefits of the courses  
> disappeared. Taking three or more remedial courses at the two-year  
> college level was negatively associated with attaining a bachelor's  
> degree, they found. Developmental education may divert them from  
> transferring to complete a higher degree.
> In addition, the results of remedial courses varied from one two- 
> year institution to another, which may reflect the diversity of new  
> developmental course models arising during the period of the study,  
> according to O'Dwyer, a specialist in educational research,  
> measurement, and evaluation.
> Shields said the results show that remedial education at the two- 
> year level is not a hindrance in the same way as it seems to be at  
> the four-year level, but researchers need to delve into which types  
> of programs are the most effective and why.
> "We need further investigation of the ingredients for success at  
> those colleges where taking developmental coursework doesn't hold  
> students back from finishing an associate's degree," Shields said.  
> "Are there institutional policies that do a better job of matching  
> students to courses? Are innovations in developmental curriculum  
> paying off? The picture looks a lot more complex than in the four- 
> year setting."
> More information: O'Dwyer and Shields will present their paper  
> "College Completion and Remedial Education: Do Institutional  
> Characteristics Make a Difference?" at 8:15 a.m. on Monday, April 7.  
> For more information about the session, please see this link.
>
> Provided by Boston College
>
> "Remedial courses fail bachelor's degree seekers, but boost those in  
> associate's programs." April 7th, 2014. http://phys.org/news/2014-04-remedial-courses-bachelor-degree-seekers.html
>
>
> Norman Stahl
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
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