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Hi All,

I was just working on my CRLA proposal, and as I was looking at the proposal deadline on the site, it said it is due at midnight on Monday, April 1.  As far as I know, today is Tuesday and it's April 1.  Was it due last night at 11:59 PM and did I miss it or is it due on April 1 (today) at 11:59 PM.  Can anyone shed light?

Laurie  L. Hazard, Ed.D.
Director, Academic Center for Excellence and the Writing Center
Adjunct Faculty, Applied Psychology
Curriculum Coordinator, Foundations for Learning
Bryant University
401-232-6746
________________________________________
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Saundra Y McGuire [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Monday, March 31, 2014 11:02 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Thoughts about Complete College America

Hi Katie,

I'd suggest looking at the site www.howtostudy.org.  The section on how to study by subject has great information.

Another great way to find suggestions for students is to google. For example if you google nursing study tips you'll see some great sites.

I hope others will post their suggestions. I have found that encouraging students and calming their fears and anxieties is great at helping them to improve.

Hoping this helps,
Saundra

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 31, 2014, at 5:48 PM, "Katie Condra" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> I have been following this thread and finding it very fascinating.  I am a
> new coordinator for a new Learning Assistance Center at a community
> college.  I am an experienced English teacher, but I have little experience
> with STEM classes, and I have many students coming into our tutoring center
> looking for support in science/math/nursing courses.  Many of you have
> mentioned study skills and strategies that you teach students to help them
> be successful in STEM classes. What would be the best way for me to learn
> some of these strategies?  What resources would you recommend that offer
> practical advice for supporting students through some of our college's
> "most challenging" STEM courses?
>
>
>> On Mon, Mar 31, 2014 at 4:05 PM, Saundra Y McGuire <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> And you might also be interested in:
>>
>> They Knew Calculus when They Left: The Thinking Disconnect between High
>> School and University
>> St. Jarre, Kevin
>> Phi Delta Kappan, v90 n2 p123-126 Oct 2008
>>
>> But again, these students can be taught to excel in college calculus when
>> we show them the difference and help them adjust.  Students who I'd assumed
>> were not willing to put in the time actually gladly put in the time when I
>> could explain to them exactly what they needed to spend time doing.  And
>> it's not just "you need to study more"...  I so regret that I had not
>> learned this earlier in my career -- I could have helped so many more
>> students whom others had written off as not entitled to  pursuing a STEM
>> career.  I agree that not everyone is cut out for a STEM career, but we
>> don't know who is an who is not until we teach all students effective
>> learning strategies.   Many students will surprise us when they start to
>> excel!
>>
>> Happy Spring!
>> Saundra
>>
>> Saundra McGuire, Ph.D.
>> (Ret) Assistant Vice Chancellor  & Professor of Chemistry
>> Director Emerita, Center for Academic Success
>> 433 Choppin Hall
>> Louisiana State University
>> Baton Rouge, LA 70803
>> 225.578.6749 phone
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
>> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Jered Wasburn-Moses
>> Sent: Monday, March 31, 2014 2:44 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: Thoughts about Complete College America
>>
>> If you missed it, you might be interested in:
>> https://chronicle.com/article/Students-Come-to-College/145473/
>>
>> "Freshmen estimate that they write about 25 hours each week, and most
>> believe that they arrived on their campus with college-level writing skills
>> fully formed."
>>
>> Jered Wasburn-Moses
>> Math Center Coordinator
>> Success Skills Coordinator
>> Learning Assistance Programs
>> Northern Kentucky University
>> http://lap.nku.edu
>> University Center 170F
>> (859) 572-5779
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
>> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Laura Smith
>> Sent: Monday, March 31, 2014 3:14 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: Thoughts about Complete College America
>>
>> Elizabeth....the elephant in the room is and will always be  READING.
>> Students have no idea nor do many that college level reading is not
>> passive but active and it is not "fun."
>>
>> Everyone is not entitled to even be in a STEM program because it just
>> doesn't mean "being there" but also "doing the work"....for each hour of
>> class....3+ hours studying (ACTIVE READING) for each class.
>>
>> ( hot button for me...)
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
>> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Smith, Elizabeth
>> Sent: Monday, March 31, 2014 12:45 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: Thoughts about Complete College America
>>
>> I agree with the aforementioned points, but one thing we may be
>> overlooking is that a high percentage of students come to college reading
>> at a 7th to 9th grade level and only at about 250 wpm.  This is woefully
>> inadequate for the reading required in STEM courses.  Only a concentrated,
>> integrated focus on those reading skills and speed will effectively address
>> the problem. There are now many innovative options for developmental
>> reading courses.  Whether the courses are required or not, instructors
>> would serve the students and themselves well to recommend additional
>> reading support either from a course or from a structured tutoring program
>> offered by student support services.
>> Elizabeth Smith
>>
>> ________________________________________
>> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [
>> [log in to unmask]] on behalf of Karin Winnard [
>> [log in to unmask]]
>> Sent: Monday, March 31, 2014 9:29 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: Thoughts about Complete College America
>>
>> I agree with you, Saundra.  A number of students we work with seem  not to
>> have been required to do 'deeper' learning.  In addition to memorization,
>> students are still providing simple answers that do not require further
>> inquiry based upon the test question, and student may not see any need or
>> reason to integrate new information with pre existing information thereby
>> growing their critical thinking skills.  When the instructor is teaching at
>> a level where critical thinking and reasoning are required to first year
>> students without a concurrent semester of a study skills course (a one unit
>> course that doubles up for six weeks and then is done) seems like a missed
>> opportunity to capture this audience of first year students.
>>
>> The colleagues and student staff we work with, see students increase their
>> self-confidence, self-efficacy and commitment when the replace their old
>> beliefs, attitudes, and habits with these new strategies and results.
>> Faculty can teach students all these exciting concepts  but if the
>> students do not know how to retain and integrate that information, the
>> results will not match the input from the instructor.  And high school has
>> not necessarily prepared them for the rigors of learning at our
>> institutions.
>>
>> Let's meet the students where they are, teach them the tools they are
>> expected to use at our colleges and universities, have them use them, and
>> then, if they don't meet our standards because they don't want to be in the
>> major, have family or financial issues, etc. then have a discussion that
>> hears out the student and discuss next steps, etc....
>>
>> (Just returned from an excellent conference in Chicago, the AAC&U
>> conference.  Very professional conference and a great opportunity to
>> discuss, listen, and bring back new ideas based on research.  Check out
>> their website and publications.)
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Karin
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPa
>>
>>> On Mar 30, 2014, at 8:45 PM, Saundra Y McGuire <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hello Listers,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I have been following this thread with great interest, and have enjoyed
>> reading the perspectives.  I apologize in advance for the long post, but I
>> wanted to make the following points.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 1.            I think Nic is right on target when he suggests that much
>> of the poor performance of students in STEM courses may be due to poor
>> teaching.  It is certainly true that most college STEM professors have had
>> no instruction in teaching, and there are now concerted efforts to provide
>> workshops for faculty to teach them basic principles about teaching and
>> learning.  (I have conducted these on numerous campuses, and they have been
>> generally very well received by the faculty.)  I am always surprised at how
>> eager these faculty are to hear about how they can teach students effective
>> learning strategies, and by how many of them have changed their teaching to
>> get students more actively involved in the learning process.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 2.            I disagree with the assertion that "Creating clearer
>> academic maps and default schedules for new entering students that put
>> college-level math and a majority of STEM courses in their first year plan
>> would help." I've seen students fail miserably when they have to take a
>> majority of STEM courses in their first year (before becoming acclimated to
>> college courses).  I think the major problem is that students' learning
>> strategies (memorization and regurgitation) do not match professors'
>> expectations (problem solving and critical thinking skills).  One of the
>> biggest surprises of my career (after 30 years of being a traditional
>> chemistry professor before becoming a part of the learning support
>> community) was how quickly students could turn poor performance around
>> after being taught effective strategies, and being supported by such things
>> as tutoring or Supplemental Instruction.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 3.            There seems to be an assumption that lack of preparation
>> translates to lack of success in STEM courses, but I have not found this to
>> necessarily be the case. We can help unprepared students, as Kathleen
>> Gabriel points out in her 2008 book,  Teaching Unprepared Students.
>> Sterling, VA:  Stylus Publishing  Below are just a few of the before
>> (students were taught effective learning strategies) and after (e one
>> session on learning strategies) scores for students we've worked with.  The
>> underlined scores are after one learning strategies session. Some of these
>> students were about the drop out of the STEM major We have numerous
>> examples like this, and I'm sure all of us have similar examples.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>              Robert, freshman chemistry student
>>>
>>>               42,  100, 100, 100                           A in course
>>>
>>>              Michael, senior pre-med organic student
>>>
>>>              30,  28,  80,  91                 B in course
>>>
>>>              Miriam, freshman calculus student
>>>
>>>              37.5, 83, 93                        B in course
>>>
>>>              Ifeanyi, sophomore thermodynamics student
>>>
>>>              67, 54, 68, 95                    B in course
>>>
>>>              Dana, first year physics student
>>>
>>> 80, 54, 91, 97, 90              A in course
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 4.            Based on changes in performance like the ones above, I
>> don't think it's possible for us to determine who is suited for a career in
>> STEM or the health sciences.  I know lots of physicians who flunked their
>> first test in general chem or organic chemistry, but are now excellent
>> physicians. I think our institutions have to put more resources into our
>> learning centers so that we can teach students (even unprepared students)
>> to succeed in STEM courses (and everything else)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Again, I apologize for the long post, but I wanted to add some comments
>> here.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks for "listening",
>>>
>>> Saundra
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Saundra McGuire, Ph.D.
>>>
>>> (Ret) Assistant Vice Chancellor  & Professor of Chemistry
>>>
>>> Director Emerita, Center for Academic Success
>>>
>>> 433 Choppin Hall
>>>
>>> Louisiana State University
>>>
>>> Baton Rouge, LA 70803
>>>
>>> 225.578.6749 phone
>>
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>
>
> --
> Katie Condra
> Student Tutoring and Access Center Coordinator
> Angelina College
> [log in to unmask]
> 936-633-4504
> Student Center, Room 101
>
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