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Leonard,

I am interested in the “Note-Making” presentation!

Thanks for sharing,
Randi

Randi Bibins-Clark, LCSW
Academic Success Practitioner | The Creighton EDGE
Creighton University
2500 California Plaza
Omaha, NE 68178
402.280.5532 | [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>

On 4/3/14, 4:35 AM, "Geddes, Leonard G." <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:

Interesting topic and great comments thus far.

Question: Why is it that whenever students are weak at something, they are always viewed as the problem?

This mindset seems to foster powerlessness among educators. Education is a relationship between educators and students, so what one side does in the relationship affects the other. Students are not great note takers, but educators are not the best presenters of information. One of the original creators of PowerPoint created a short online booklet entitled "Death by Powerpoint" in which he described how the medium is misused.  Educators were among the worst offenders.  PowerPoint is a visual medium, yet educators often use it as a glorified Word document.

A more effective use of the PowerPoint platform is to use visual imagery to complement the presenter's message. This way the message being seen by the audience does not overpower the message being heard. Students (and all other humans) operate best when they do not have to divide their attention among three different cognitive functions: listening, reading and writing at the same time.

The metacognitive piece -- Students do not fully get how their notes will read to them later in the day or a few days later. Students must move from transcribing information to connecting what they are writing to how the information interacts with what is in their minds.  This moves them from simply taking notes to making notes as Nic suggested.

Taking too many notes is a very common problem; it is an indicator that students lack depth of knowledge. Distinguishing between important and less important information requires prioritization, which is a higher-order thinking skill in itself. To prioritize information, students must be able to effectively analyze the information and then make judgments about what is essential, not essential, the degree to which they grasp material, etc.  And they must continually do this throughout class -- pretty tall order.

I believe I still have an old presentation I used to share with faculty and our tutors on effective "Note-Making." I'll search for it if there is interest.

Leonard Geddes, MA
Associate Dean of Co-Curricular Programs
Coordinator of the Lohr Learning Commons
(828) 328-7024
[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
www.lr.edu
Personal Learning Assistance Blog - The Well: thewelledu.com
________________________________________
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>] On Behalf Of cassandra.l.hawkins-wilson [[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>]
Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2014 2:01 PM
To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Chron of Higher Education

Teaching all level of students, I have noticed that taking notes is a
skill, which many of them lack.  I no longer teach with PowerPoint. When I
taught with PowerPoint, students would be so focused on the bullets, which
were on the slides, that they would miss the actual lecture.  I currently
use the flipped classroom method to assist students with the retention of
knowledge.  I am interested in techniques that effectively teach students
how to efficiently take notes.

Best regards,

Cassandra


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On Wed, Apr 2, 2014 at 9:40 AM, Milligan, Teresa <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>wrote:

Many instructors at our college have told me that students simply don't
take notes, and they aren't sure how to "get" them to take notes or see the
value of them or use them, etc. I think this speaks to a couple of points.

1. Notes, as a topic in general, seem to be viewed as either right or
wrong both in the content and the structure. In my view, electronic notes
are tough for lectures, especially for struggling students, mostly because
they don't (yet) easily allow for the on-the-fly structuring needed to
match a speaker's thought path. If struggling students are afraid of doing
something wrong, chances are they won't do it at all. We could use that
ounce of preparation, as could our students, to scaffold for that fear.

2. Students do not seem to want to take the risk of ruling out a piece of
information as unimportant, and then need to know it for a test or job. So,
if they were to take notes, they'd write down EVERYTHING. Or, they don't
take notes at all. What's more, writing is what we say + how we say it.
Students can only last so long if they're struggling with both. We could do
a better job of helping students sift information and teaching them how
organize it.

3. Many of our instructors use PowerPoint for their lectures, and then
encourage students to follow along during lectures. This is a great effort,
but what a student might write down for notes is often already on the
slide. We could explore how to use technology as a tool.

4. The issue of teaching teachers how to teach appears again! I see
instructors too often simply ignore this and blame the student, or take a
sort of sink-or-swim attitude; or, explicitly tell the students what to
write down for notes. There are plenty of scaffolding strategies available
to TEACH - not tell - students how to take notes without breaking from the
normal curriculum. We could make that a part of a healthy professional
development program.

Whether electronic or longhand, the issues surrounding note-taking seem to
be symptoms of a larger issue. That final quote in the original post -
"...if the notes are taken indiscriminately or by mindlessly transcribing
content...the benefit disappears" - hints at a starting point.

Teresa Milligan
Instructor, Elftmann Student Success Center
Dunwoody College of Technology
818 Dunwoody Blvd.
Minneapolis, MN 55403
Direct:  612.381.3364
dunwoody.edu/elftmann

Let us not think of education only in terms of its costs, but rather in
terms of the infinite potential of the human mind that can be realized
through education.
-John F. Kennedy




-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>] On Behalf Of Larina Warnock
Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2014 1:24 PM
To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Chron of Higher Education

I find that many of my developmental students, regardless of whether they
are using a laptop or taking longhand notes, take too many notes and take
them on the wrong things (e.g. they write down the examples instead of the
concepts). When they learn strategies to decide what they should take notes
on and stop trying to write down everything the teacher says, grades begin
to improve. Even so, students who take notes on a laptop also sometimes get
distracted by the red and green lines of MSWord and try to correct their
spelling and grammar as they type. This practice distracts them from
actually absorbing the content. I think when we write notes longhand, we
don't worry so much about format and we have no visible little lines
telling us that we did something wrong. I wonder if turning off grammar and
spell check while taking notes would alter the findings at all.

Larina Warnock
Developmental Studies Instructor
WH214
541-917-2311

We read to know we are not alone. -C.S. Lewis


On Tue, Apr 1, 2014 at 7:02 AM, Nic Voge <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:

> Like all experimental designs, the application to practice is
> under-conceptualized, but this is an intriguing finding. It assumes
> that elaborated, organized encoding happens best at the time of
> exposure, rather than, say, after class--which is dubious--and makes
> no account of the "life" of the notes after 30 minutes.
>
> Nonetheless, it speaks powerfully to docile, mindless "engagement" in
> class.
>
> Best,
> Nic
> __________________________________
> Dominic (Nic) J. Voge
> [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> (609)258-6921
> http://www.princeton.edu/mcgraw/us/
>
> Associate Director
> McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning 328C Frist Campus Center
> Princeton University Princeton, NJ 08544
>
> Individual Appointment Times:
> By request
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Apr 1, 2014, at 9:49 AM, Norman Stahl wrote:
>
>  March 28, 2014 by Danya Perez-Hernandez
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Comments (30)
>>
>>
>> Taking Notes by Hand Benefits Recall, Researchers Find
>>
>> Distractions posed by laptops in the classroom have been a common
>> concern, but new research suggests that even if laptops are used
>> strictly to take notes, typing notes hinders students' academic
>> performance compared with writing notes on paper with a pen or pencil.
>> Daniel M. Oppenheimer, an associate professor of psychology at the
>> University of California at Los Angeles, and Pam Mueller, a graduate
>> student at Princeton University, studied the effects of students'
>> note-taking preferences. Their findings will be published in a paper
>> in Psychological Science called "The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard:
>> Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note-Taking."
>> The researchers' goal was to figure out whether typing notes--which
>> is becoming increasingly popular--has any direct effect on a
>> students' ability to understand a lecture.
>> In a series of studies, the researchers provided students with
>> laptops or with pen and paper to take notes. (The computers were
>> disconnected from the
>> Internet.) Students were then tested on how well they could recall
>> facts and apply concepts. During the first test, students were told
>> to "use their normal classroom note-taking strategy." Some typed, and
>> others wrote longhand. They were tested 30 minutes later.
>> The researchers aimed to measure the increased opportunity to
>> "mindlessly" take verbatim notes when using laptops.
>> "Verbatim note-taking, as opposed to more selective strategies,
>> signals less encoding of content," says the researchers' report.
>> Although laptop users took almost twice the amount of notes as those
>> writing longhand, they scored significantly lower in the conceptual
>> part of the test. Both groups had similar scores on the factual test.
>> In another part of the study, some laptop users were instructed to
>> avoid taking verbatim notes. Instructors explained that "people who
>> take class notes on laptops when they expect to be tested on the
>> material later tend to transcribe what they're hearing without
>> thinking about it much." But members of that group received lower
>> scores in both conceptual and factual tests than did their longhand
counterparts.
>> "While more notes are beneficial, at least to a point, if the notes
>> are taken indiscriminately or by mindlessly transcribing content, as
>> is more likely the case on a laptop, the benefit disappears," says the
report.
>>
>>
>> Norman Stahl
>> [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>
>>
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