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Hi Michelle.

Several years ago, Ray Reagans and I showed that the inner logic of structural holes theory implies that there is no net advantage to optimizing a network for nonredundancy among contacts.  (The fact that there is generally a positive association in empirical data is probably due to selection effects) The reason is that the *returns* associated with optimizing for nonredunancy are great, so are the risks.  You can find are demonstration of this in the symposium on structural holes published by Industrial and Corporate Change in 2008.  Our contributions are the first and last papers:

Reagans, Ray E. and Ezra W. Zuckerman. 2008. "Why knowledge does not equal power: the network redundancy trade-off" Industrial and Corporate Change, Volume 17, Number 5, pp. 903944.

Reagans, Ray E. and Ezra W. Zuckerman. 2008. "All in the Family; reply to Burt, Podolny, and van de Rijt, Ban, and Sarkarf" Industrial and Corporate Change, Volume 17, Number 5, pp. 979999.


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Ezra W. Zuckerman Sivan
MIT Sloan School of Management
E62-488
Cambridge, MA 02142
+1-617-253-1918
http://web.mit.edu/ewzucker/www/

From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of George Acheampong [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 5:41 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: When brokerage is negatively associated with economic productivity

***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
Hi Michele,

You may want to check Bizzi (2013) The Dark Side of Structural Holes: A  multilevel investigation. But you are not alone in this. I am also finding negative effects. Goodluck.

George

On 12 November 2014 00:47, Michele Barnes-Mauthe <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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Aloha SOCNET community,

I am looking for existing research indicating that in some cases, bridging and/or brokerage may cause economic disadvantages for individuals, particularly when or if there are strong network subgroups which may "penalize" brokers for associating with other groups. 

I am very familiar with Burt's work on brokerage, but my primary takeaway from it is that occupying brokerage positions is thought to be a source of social capital expected to generate benefits. I am looking for theoretical and/or empirical evidence that suggests the opposite - i.e., people who broker are significantly less productive (economically), particularly when/if there are strong network subgroups that may cause brokers (defined as individuals who bridge these network subgroups) to be socially ostracized for associating with other groups.

If anyone can point me in the direction of existing research (in any field) that sheds light on this sort of effect, it would be much appreciated.

Thank you in advance for your time,
Michele Barnes-Mauthe


Michele Barnes-Mauthe
Research Assistant, PhD Candidate
Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Interested in marine resource management? Check out our new publications on ethnic diversity and social network structure in Hawaii's longline fishery here: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol18/iss1/art23/, the global economic value of shark ecotourism herehttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8956430and the total economic value of small-scale fisheries and their contribution to sustainable livelihoods here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783613001537
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Best Regards | Med Venlig Hilsen

George Acheampong
PhD Fellow
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_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.