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Dear Michele,

We haven't tested whether bridging is a detriment per se, but we know in some cases in disaster settings that it's not nearly as benefiicial as is closure/density for mental health and stress (while in other cases-i.e., cases in which resource loss is relatively high and access to resources is physically distant--bridging does seem the most protective for post-disaster settings). Eric

2014 A.J. Faas, E.C. Jones, L.M. Whiteford, G.A. Tobin, and A.D. Murphy. Gendered Paths to Formal and Informal Resources in Post-Disaster Development in the Ecuadorian Andes. Mountain Research and Development 34(3):223-334.
2014 E.C. Jones, G.A. Tobin, C. McCarty, A.J. Faas, H. Yepes, L.M. Whiteford, A.D. Murphy. "Articulation of Personal Network Structure with Gendered Well-Being in Disaster and Relocation Settings," in Issues of Gender and Sexual Orientation in Humanitarian Emergencies. Edited by Larry Roeder, pp. 19-28. New York: Springer.
2014 Tobin, G.A., L.M. Whiteford, A.D. Murphy, E.C. Jones, and C. McCarty. "Modeling Social Networks and Community Resilience in Chronic Disasters: Case Studies from Volcanic Areas in Ecuador and Mexico," in Resilience and Sustainability in Relation to natural Disasters: A Challenge for Future Cities. Edited by P. Gasparini, G. Manfredi and D. Asprone. New York: Springer Briefs in Earth Sciences.
2013 E.C. Jones, A.J. Faas, A.D. Murphy, G.A. Tobin, L.M. Whiteford, C. McCarty. Cross-Cultural and Site-Based Influences on which Demographic, Individual Well-being, and Social Network Factors Predict Risk Perception in Hazard and Disaster Settings. Human Nature 24(1):5-32.


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From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Michele Barnes-Mauthe [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Tuesday, November 11, 2014 16:47
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [SOCNET] When brokerage is negatively associated with economic productivity
***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
Aloha SOCNET community,

I am looking for existing research indicating that in some cases, bridging and/or brokerage may cause economic disadvantages for individuals, particularly when or if there are strong network subgroups which may "penalize" brokers for associating with other groups.

I am very familiar with Burt's work on brokerage, but my primary takeaway from it is that occupying brokerage positions is thought to be a source of social capital expected to generate benefits. I am looking for theoretical and/or empirical evidence that suggests the opposite - i.e., people who broker are significantly less productive (economically), particularly when/if there are strong network subgroups that may cause brokers (defined as individuals who bridge these network subgroups) to be socially ostracized for associating with other groups.

If anyone can point me in the direction of existing research (in any field) that sheds light on this sort of effect, it would be much appreciated.

Thank you in advance for your time,
Michele Barnes-Mauthe


Michele Barnes-Mauthe
Research Assistant, PhD Candidate
Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management
University of Hawaii at Manoa
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