Print

Print


I'm having trouble digesting the "GRIT" factor. I see its appeal and resonance: students who work harder than others and persevere perform better. It fits the american work hard and you'll succeed mantra. However, I'm curious if anyone else sees this differently.

First point: I've had numerous tutors through the years who have expressed guilt because their tutees sometimes work much harder than they did when they were in the class. Personally, I've tracked students' study hours and also see that many struggling students are hardworking. This is why I frequently tell students that doing the wrong things the right way is no better than doing the right things the wrong way.

Second point: Based upon the Scale's questions, it seems that stick-to-it-ness is a major factor in determining whether someone has grit. But tenacity for tenacity's sake may not be a positive attribute. The ability to assess your circumstances and redirect yourself in a different way to achieve a different goal is sometimes a better approach.  Does changing course mean that you lack grit?  I think the ability to redirect take significant humility and critical thinking skills. I was discussing this with a veteran who said, "Grit" is one of the things that prevented us from acknowledging that going to war in Iraq was a bad decision.

Maybe I'm missing something. I am not familiar with the research. Can anyone shed any further light on it?

Leonard Geddes, MA
Associate Dean of Co-Curricular Programs
Director of the Lohr Learning Commons
(828) 328-7024
[log in to unmask]
www.lr.edu
Personal Learning Assistance Blog - The Well: thewelledu.com
________________________________________
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Kathryn Van Wagoner [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2015 6:43 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Duckworth's GRIT Scale

Someone did a Master's thesis to see if GRIT predicted success for our dev
math students. She found no correlations. One possible reason is that the
GRIT is written for a traditional freshman audience and we have over 60%
non-traditional students.

On 1/21/15 9:36 AM, "Kathy Haberer" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>Is anyone using this scale in anyway? Multiple measures, retention
>activities, etc.
>
>Kathy Haberer, Director
>Student Development and Counseling
>618-468-4126
>FAX 618-468-7257
>www.lc.edu/disability<http://www.lc.edu/disability>
>[cid:[log in to unmask]]
>
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
>subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
>browser to
>http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html
>
>To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]