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 From the literature of network as a metaphor, an insightful article is:

Jentoft, S. (2000). The Community: A Missing Link of Fisheries 
Management. /Marine Policy/, 24, 53-59.

An example of creative network analysis is:

Crona, B. & Bodin, Ö. (2006). What you know is who you know? 
Communication patterns among resource users as a prerequisite for 
co-management. /Ecology and Society/, 11 (2), 7.

An here we made a comparison of the industries of the Atlantic and 
Mediterranean artisanal fisheries in Spain, with personal networks 
meta-representations:
http://personal.us.es/isidromj/php/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/EUSN2014_Puertos-R.pdf

Kind regards,

----------------------------------------------
Isidro Maya Jariego
Departamento de Psicología Social
Universidad de Sevilla
Calle Camilo José Cela s/n
41.018-Sevilla (Spain)
Tf.: + 34 95 455 73 44
Fax: + 34 95 455 77 11
[log in to unmask]
http://personal.us.es/isidromj
http://evoluntas.wordpress.com
http://revista-redes.rediris.es
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El 28/01/15 a las 07:04, Garry Robins escribió:
>
> The really interesting question here is what counts as an effective 
> network structure in terms of sustainability (or indeed more generally 
> what counts as “effective” network structure for any particular social 
> system and outcome).
>
> You could engage the network governance literature, although large 
> parts of that literature treat the idea of a network as a metaphor or 
> an interpretive device and not an empirical topic of investigation. 
> Let me suggest a few articles which have a more overt network 
> formulation that could be tested:
>
> Carlsson and Sandstrom (2008). Network governance of the commons. 
> International Journal of the commons 2, 35-54.
>
> Berardo & Scholz (2010). Self organizing policy networks: Risk, 
> partner selection and cooperation in estuaries. American Journal of 
> Political Science, 54, 632-649.
>
> Jones, Hesterley & Borgatti (1997). A general theory of network 
> governance: Exchange conditions and social mechanisms. Academy of 
> Management Review, 22, 911-945.
>
> Robins, Bates & Pattison. (2011). Network governance and environmental 
> management: Conflict and cooperation. Public Administration, 
> 89,//1293-1313.
>
> Kenis & Provan (2009). Towards an exogenous theory of public network 
> performance. Public Administration, 87, 440-456.
>
> Lubell (2013). Governing institutional complexity: the ecology of 
> games framework. Policy Studies Journal, 41.
>
> Others have mentioned the Bodin and Prell book, which is excellent.
>
> A really interesting development is the study of social ecological 
> systems. You could try:
>
> Ostrom (2009) A general framework for analyzing sustainability of 
> social-ecological systems. Science, 325, 419.
>
> But even Elinor Ostrom’s work leaves the network structure relatively 
> undifferentiated.
>
> So to go further, for a very innovative take on a serious network 
> conceptualization of social-ecological systems, look at:
>
> Bodin & Tengo (2012). Disentangling intangible social-ecological 
> systems. Global Environmental Change.
>
> And then you will see that this structure is actually that of a 
> multilevel network, as per Lazega et al (2008), Catching up with big 
> fish in the big pond? Multilevel network analysis through linked 
> design, Social Networks, 30, 57-176;
>
> and Wang et al. (2013). Exponential random graph models for multilevel 
> networks. Social Networks, 35,//96-115/./
>
> (Which is why we are currently working on ERGMs and social ecological 
> systems… more to come on that topic).
>
> Garry
>
> //
>
> *From:*Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] 
> *On Behalf Of *Jordi Comas
> *Sent:* Wednesday, 28 January 2015 9:56 AM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Sustainability as a normative outcome and SNA
>
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>
> Hi all-
>
> Some colleagues asked me about preparing a course about network theory 
> and research within a Sustainability curriculum.
>
> "Sustainability" here means not just "being green," but something 
> broader in the sense of organizations or social systems that create 
> value today in ways that ensure the capacity to function in the 
> future.  In my mind, it overlaps some with ideas about managing common 
> goods as well as normative approaches to stakeholder managing.  Also, 
> what some would call robust action.
>
> Do any obvious or non-obvious links to research or research topics 
> come to mind to this fine group?
>
> Thanks as always!
>
> Jordi
>
> -- 
>
> *Jordi Comas*
> /
> "There is nothing so practical as a good theory." Kurt Lewin
>
> /Assistant Professor
> School of Management
> Bucknell University
> Taylor 112
> 570 577 3161
>
> SPRING 2015 The Stakeholder Organization Site (the Hub"). 
> <http://stakeholder.blogs.bucknell.edu>
> Research and Writing Blog: Nets We Weave 
> <http://netsweweave.wordpress.com>
>
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