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This also depends on what are what you call "networks".  Are these complete
networks or are these samples from different networks, potentially sampled
in a different way?

On Sat, Feb 7, 2015 at 4:02 PM, Thomas William Valente <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

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>
> Seok-Woo
> The major centrality measures, degree, closeness and betweenness, all have
> a nodal version and a normalized one which corrects for the network size.
> For example, degree centrality can be a count of the number of links for
> each node (the nodal version) and the count divided by network size minus
> one which is the maximum possible degree score for any network.  This
> latter measure is the normalized degree centrality and can be compared
> between different networks and it ranges from zero to one.   If the
> networks are approximately equal there should be no problem making such
> comparisons.  However it is conceivable that there is an association
> between centrality and network size in the sense that it may be possible to
> have very central nodes in very small networks but unlikely in large ones.
> For example, a team of 10 people may readily agree who is the most popular
> or who is a natural leader, but a group of 100 or a 1,000 would have
> considerably more variability on who is the mos!
>  t popular.
> UCINET readily provides these measures.
> -Tom
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of Seok-Woo Kwon
> Sent: Saturday, February 7, 2015 11:07 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: comparing centrality scores across networks
>
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>
> Hello,
>
> I am wondering if I can compare centrality measures across networks. For
> example, node A from network 1 has a centrality score of 3 and node B from
> network 2 has a centrality score of 1, (and the two networks are not
> related and different in size). Can I still conclude that A is more central
> in network 1 than B is in network 2? Or does this depend on what kinds of
> centrality we are talking about?
>
> Also, if this conclusion is misleading, is there a normalized centrality
> score that can be compared across networks? I am hoping someone on this
> list can help.
>
> Thanks.
>
> ==============================
> Seok-Woo Kwon
> Assistant Professor
> Dept. of Strategic Management
> Fox School of Business
> Temple University
> 544 Alter Hall
> 1801 Liacouras Walk
> Philadelphia, PA 19122
>
> [log in to unmask]
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