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Perhaps of relevance:

Friedkin, N. E. (1983). Horizons of observability and limits of informal
control in organizations. *Social Forces*, *62*(1), 54-77.

There are various views on the relationship between the interpersonal
communication networks within organizations and informal social control The
relative merits of some of these viewpoints can be assessed by examining
the distribution of interpersonal observability in communication networks.
In a study of six communication networks, it is demonstrated that there is
a “horizon” to observability (a distance in a communication network beyond
which persons are unlikely to be aware of the role performance of other
persons). Observability tends to be restricted to persons who are either in
direct contact or who have at least one contact in common. It is shown,
moreover, that the number of contacts shared by two persons is a powerful
predictor of the probability that one person is aware of the role
performance of another, according to a simple stochastic function. Based on
this evidence, some viewpoints on informal control structures are more
plausible than others. A theory is presented that is consistent wi th both
the present evidence and current thinking on the relationship of
communication network structure and informal control. It is hoped that the
theory will provide a useful starting point for future studies of this
relationship.





David Lazer
*(pronounced as if it were Lazar)*
Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Computer and Information
Science
Northeastern University
Co-Director, NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks:
http://www.northeastern.edu/nulab/


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On Wed, May 27, 2015 at 11:24 PM, Ian McCulloh <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>  ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
> Hello!
>
>  Is anyone aware of any empirical social network studies that evaluate an
> ego's accuracy in reporting (or being aware of) his friends' friends (2nd
> order connections)?  Even better would be extending this to 3rd, 4th, 5th,
> etc order.
>
>  I'm familiar with the literature on social network search, such as
> Granovetter's famous six degrees experiment and Duncan Watts' more recent
> email version, but this is not really what I'm looking for.
>
>  I want to know how aware is an individual of network connections that
> exist beyond their immediate ties.
>
>  The closest literature I have found is David Krackhardt's cognitive
> social structure work, however, the networks are small networks and I would
> prefer to see data where a larger diameter is possible.
>
>  I appreciate any leads you might have.
>
>  Kind Regards,
>
>  Ian
>
>  Ian McCulloh, Ph.D.
> Johns Hopkins University
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