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Ian,

The seminal study of network horizons (how far can you see *into* the network) was done by Noah Friedkin in 1983 -- Horizons of Observability.

http://www.soc.ucsb.edu/faculty/friedkin/Reprints/SFHorizon.PDF

BTW, you can forget about "seeing" your 4th, 5th step etc.  -- 3rd steps are hard enough.  ;-)

Valdis Krebs
Orgnet, LLC
Twitter: @orgnet
http://orgnet.com
http://thenetworkthinkers.com

On May 27, 2015, at 11:24 PM, Ian McCulloh wrote:

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Hello!

Is anyone aware of any empirical social network studies that evaluate an ego's accuracy in reporting (or being aware of) his friends' friends (2nd order connections)?  Even better would be extending this to 3rd, 4th, 5th, etc order.

I'm familiar with the literature on social network search, such as Granovetter's famous six degrees experiment and Duncan Watts' more recent email version, but this is not really what I'm looking for.

I want to know how aware is an individual of network connections that exist beyond their immediate ties.

The closest literature I have found is David Krackhardt's cognitive social structure work, however, the networks are small networks and I would prefer to see data where a larger diameter is possible.

I appreciate any leads you might have.

Kind Regards,

Ian

Ian McCulloh, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
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