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You may find interesting the following paper. Although the authors do not
direct their attention to formulating the sort of theory you seek, they
certainly offer a basis for shaping such a theory. In any event, it
functions well within my work on complicated social (human) networks and
the emergence of cooperation. I believe that at least one of the authors
(The Anh Han) makes the paper available on his Academia.edu page.

Martínez-Vaquero, Luis A., The Anh Han, Luís Moniz Pereira, and Tom
Lenaerts (9 June 2015). Apology and forgiveness evolve to resolve failures
in cooperative agreements. *Scientific Reports* 5, 10639; doi:
10.1038/srep10639 (2015).


I hope that this information is helpful.
Jack

Research Professor of Geographically-Integrated History
Idaho State University, USA
https://idahostate.academia.edu/JBJackOwens



On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 7:14 PM, nativebuddha <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
> Okay. For instance, a person is in one peer group, and he/she decides to
> leave that group of friends for a new group. I'm less interested in the
> rational actor/cost-benefit approach and looking for something that
> considers factors that hold the person back from exiting, such as group
> cohesion. What are the structural reasons in a network that keeps someone
> from leaving, and/or allows them to enter a new network of friends?
>
> On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 8:16 PM, Jordi Comas <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Hi-
>>
>> Can you be more specific?  Most theories would have to do with the nature
>> of the relationships in that network.  Also, the boundary specification
>> matters.  Like, a computer is unlikely to exit one network of computers and
>> join a power grid network.  My point is that why are the two networks
>> similar enough that the "agent" would consider leaving one and joining
>> another?  Both networks must have some larger, non-structural or relational
>> sameness or else it is kind of a meaningless question.
>>
>> Jordi
>>
>> On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 7:55 PM, nativebuddha <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> Looking for theory that helps describe when an agent exits one network
>>> for another (why?).
>>>
>>> Any help much appreciated.
>>>
>>> -nb
>>> _____________________________________________________________________
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>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> *Jordi Comas*
>>
>>
>>
>> *"There is nothing so practical as a good theory."  Kurt Lewin*Assistant
>> Professor
>> School of Management
>> Bucknell University
>> Taylor 112
>> 570 577 3161
>>
>> SPRING 2015 The Stakeholder Organization Site (the Hub").
>> <http://stakeholder.blogs.bucknell.edu>
>>
>> Spring 2015 Stakeholder FRIDAY Blog <https://stakeholder13.wordpress.com>
>> Spring 2015 Stakeholder MONDAY Blog
>> <https://stakeholderxiv.wordpress.com/>
>> Research and Writing Blog: Nets We Weave
>> <http://netsweweave.wordpress.com>
>>
>>
>>
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-- 
Dr. J. B. "Jack" Owens, Ph.D.
Idaho State University

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