***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
You may find interesting the following paper. Although the authors do not direct their attention to formulating the sort of theory you seek, they certainly offer a basis for shaping such a theory. In any event, it functions well within my work on complicated social (human) networks and the emergence of cooperation. I believe that at least one of the authors (The Anh Han) makes the paper available on his Academia.edu page.

Martínez-Vaquero, Luis A., The Anh Han, Luís Moniz Pereira, and Tom Lenaerts (9 June 2015). Apology and forgiveness evolve to resolve failures in cooperative agreements. Scientific Reports 5, 10639; doi: 10.1038/srep10639 (2015).



I hope that this information is helpful.
Jack

Research Professor of Geographically-Integrated History
Idaho State University, USA
https://idahostate.academia.edu/JBJackOwens



On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 7:14 PM, nativebuddha <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
Okay. For instance, a person is in one peer group, and he/she decides to leave that group of friends for a new group. I'm less interested in the rational actor/cost-benefit approach and looking for something that considers factors that hold the person back from exiting, such as group cohesion. What are the structural reasons in a network that keeps someone from leaving, and/or allows them to enter a new network of friends?

On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 8:16 PM, Jordi Comas <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Hi-

Can you be more specific?  Most theories would have to do with the nature of the relationships in that network.  Also, the boundary specification matters.  Like, a computer is unlikely to exit one network of computers and join a power grid network.  My point is that why are the two networks similar enough that the "agent" would consider leaving one and joining another?  Both networks must have some larger, non-structural or relational sameness or else it is kind of a meaningless question.

Jordi

On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 7:55 PM, nativebuddha <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
Hi,

Looking for theory that helps describe when an agent exits one network for another (why?).

Any help much appreciated.

-nb
_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.



--
Jordi Comas

"There is nothing so practical as a good theory."  Kurt Lewin

Assistant Professor
School of Management
Bucknell University
Taylor 112
570 577 3161

SPRING 2015 The Stakeholder Organization Site (the Hub").


_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.



--
Dr. J. B. "Jack" Owens, Ph.D.
Idaho State University

_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.