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Hi,

You may want to take a look at the following:

Ahuja, G., Soda, G., & Zaheer, A. 2012. The genesis and dynamics of organizational networks. Organization Science, 23(2): 434-448.

Sasovova, Z., Mehra, A., Borgatti, S. P., & Schippers, M. C. 2010. Network churn: The effects of self-monitoring personality on brokerage dynamics. Administrative Science Quarterly, 55: 639-670.

Also, Martin Kilduff and Wenpin Tsai (Social Networks and Organizations, 2003, Chapter 5) present an interesting theory about network trajectories, whereby they consider network changes as a function of two processes: Goal-directedness (relationships develop and evolve around specific goals that members share) and serendipitous (such that network trajectories develop relatively haphazardly, with no specific goals driving interaction processes). 

Finally, work on balance theory might help, e.g., Hummon, N. P., & Doreian, P. 2003. Some dynamics of social balance processes: Bringing Heider back into balance theory. Social Networks, 25: 17-49. 

Good luck!

Best,
Jessica


> On Jun 18, 2015, at 9:14 PM, nativebuddha <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
> Okay. For instance, a person is in one peer group, and he/she decides to leave that group of friends for a new group. I'm less interested in the rational actor/cost-benefit approach and looking for something that considers factors that hold the person back from exiting, such as group cohesion. What are the structural reasons in a network that keeps someone from leaving, and/or allows them to enter a new network of friends?
> 
> On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 8:16 PM, Jordi Comas <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
> Hi-
> 
> Can you be more specific?  Most theories would have to do with the nature of the relationships in that network.  Also, the boundary specification matters.  Like, a computer is unlikely to exit one network of computers and join a power grid network.  My point is that why are the two networks similar enough that the "agent" would consider leaving one and joining another?  Both networks must have some larger, non-structural or relational sameness or else it is kind of a meaningless question.
> 
> Jordi
> 
> On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 7:55 PM, nativebuddha <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org <http://www.insna.org/> *****
> Hi,
> 
> Looking for theory that helps describe when an agent exits one network for another (why?).
> 
> Any help much appreciated.
> 
> -nb
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> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Jordi Comas
> 
> "There is nothing so practical as a good theory."  Kurt Lewin
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