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Hi all:

I'm new to this list, but as part time faculty I see plagiarism like this regularly. A scenario that's becoming common: students are using one common paper, reorganizing it, and turning it in as original work to (primarily) online classes. Sometimes students are registering for different sections taught through different campuses of a state-wide college or university, but it also happens across campuses within a local area.

There's a lot of denial by the students involved, but the situation has gone from problematic to critical from a faculty perspective. The other dilemma: such a high percentage of classes are taught by adjunct faculty who (literally) are not paid for their grading time, which means they are researching and documenting cases of plagiarism on their own time.

I don't have a solution to offer. In my "day job" I'm an academic advisor, and I've heard students say they are "joking" about taking a class online so that they can cheat. There's simply no way to emphasize to them how high the consequences are - they seem to believe they will not be caught or penalized.

Regards to all, Meryl

J. Meryl Krieger, Ph.D.
Adjunct Lecturer, Departments of Sociology and Anthropology
Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
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-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Stephanie Carter
Sent: Thursday, October 08, 2015 12:21 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: possible intent to cheat revealed

A few years ago, we had a student disclose to his French tutor that he was going to take a piece of someone else's writing, use Google to translate it into French, and then hand it in. The tutor tried to dissuade the student from using this approach (which would have been plagiarism and cheating - and would have been a poor piece of work to boot!), but she didn't think she got through to the student. The tutor came to me as her supervisor. I called the student in and spoke with him about the seriousness of the situation the next day after the appointment. By that time, I believe that the tutor's warnings about this approach had sunken in, and the student decided to do the work himself. 

Stephanie
__________________________________________________________________

Stephanie K. Carter, M.A.

Director, Academic Center for Excellence and the Writing Center

Bryant University

1150 Douglas Pike

Smithfield, RI 02917



(w) 401.232.6568

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www.bryant.edu/writingcenter





________________________________________
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Tasha E. Morwell [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Thursday, October 08, 2015 12:01 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: possible intent to cheat revealed

I have the dubious advantage of having experienced this during my time as a peer tutor.

A student whom I considered a friend came to me and revealed that she intended to cheat on an exam.  She assumed that because we were "friends", I wouldn't do anything.  I didn't want to do anything to discourage her from coming back to the learning center, but I couldn't keep quiet.  I went to my supervisor, who then went to the instructor of the class in question and alerted her that this particular student had revealed an intent to cheat.  The instructor then kept an extra watchful eye and prevented the student from cheating.  The student never had to know I had reported her.

This is a really important situation to discuss with tutors during tutor training- thank you for bringing it up.


Tasha Morwell
Assistant Director of the Center for Learning Excellence Jenkins Education Complex 208 MacMurray College
447 East College Avenue
Jacksonville, Illinois 62650
217-479-7131

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-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Wolfe, Angela C
Sent: Thursday, October 08, 2015 10:27 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: possible intent to cheat revealed

Good Morning, All.

While this has not been a 'real' scenario in our center - to my knowledge - I asked a senior tutor to compile some tutor scenarios for tutor training.  One of the scenarios is the following:

You are a peer tutor that has been meeting with a student to tutor in Elementary French.  Halfway through your session, the tutee reveals their intent to cheat on the next exam.  What do you do?

I am interested in learning what your recommended response for the tutor is; as well as, your response should it be brought to you by the tutor!

Thanks, advance!

Angie
Angie Wolfe, Coordinator
Academic Coaching & Tutoring Center
University of Pittsburgh at Bradford
814.362.7674
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