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I think it's important to distinguish individual students offering tutoring
under their own auspices for extra money from tutoring outfits such as
Chegg and others that aggressively advertise.

I don't know that it's possible nor wise to try to enact a campus policy
forbidding a student from charging a classmate for tutoring. If the tutor
oversteps and elides into doing the work for the student, then that might
be addressed, if it's discerned from existing campus academic honesty and
ethics policies. The effort might be better in re-advertising what your
learning center does, its hours, and so on, reminding students that your
service is included as part of the tuition and fees they already pay to the
college.

Another way to attend to students who charge, is to invite them to apply to
your center. If they have an interest in teaching and coaching, they might
make a good add to staff. If for some reason -- budgets, the student's
financial aide status, grade level -- hiring is not possible, then you
might still consider inviting them to your tutor training courses or
workshops, if only to expose them to best practices.



On Fri, Feb 19, 2016 at 10:13 AM, Jered Wasburn-Moses <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> We've encountered this not just from individual students (and
> departments), but also from an advertisement sent out by our on-campus
> bookstore (B&N)!
>
> We asked the bookstore to discontinue the ad, which they did (or say they
> did, anyway). There's really no way to prevent individual students from
> offering their "services". You could do a targeted ad campaign about why
> your "free" (actually "pre-paid") services are better than the competition.
>
> Jered Wasburn-Moses
> Associate Director for Tutoring Programs
> Learning Assistance Programs
> Northern Kentucky University
> http://lap.nku.edu
> University Center 170F
> (859) 572-5779
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Spanella, Theresa
> Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2016 4:15 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Non-Tutor Students Charging for "Tutoring"
>
> Greetings-
>
> In the past two days, we've run into a big of a conundrum. We have had, on
> two separate occasions in two separate majors, heard of students who are
> *not* trained tutors charging students for tutoring when our department
> offers the same services for free.
>
> I am wondering if any institutions include a written policy in their
> student handbooks or catalogs regarding situations like this.
>
> Our concern is that students who  need help are not getting the help they
> need from qualified tutors and that they are paying for services we offer
> for free (by qualified/trained tutors).
>
> Any input would be appreciated!
> Theresa
>
>
> Theresa A. Spanella, M.A.Ed.
> Learning Commons Coordinator
> Mount Aloysius College
> 7373 Admiral Peary Highway
> Cresson, PA  16630
> 814.886.6566
>
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-- 
nick.carbone at gmail dot com
http://ncarbone.blogspot.com

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