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> On Jul 8, 2016, at 4:26 AM, Buchler, Norbou CIV USARMY RDECOM ARL (US) <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> In low performing small teams, we find more communications and the team leader is central.
> In high performing teams, we find less communications overall and the team leader is in the periphery.

Teams and Tasks

Reply to Norbou Buchler

Norbou,
You write,

"In low performing small teams, we find more communications and the team leader is central.
In high performing teams, we find less communications overall and the team leader is in the periphery."

I have no data with quantitative performance measures to cite. But I do have a thought to offer: Consider task as well as team.

In the Japanese advertising world, where I study the creative teams that produce award-winning ads, teams operate in two very different situations. One is the new business pitch, competing against rival teams. The other is a project for an already established account. 

Teams are frequently assembled ad hoc for new business pitches. The members may not have worked together before and no one knows exactly what the potential client is looking for. During brainstorming sessions, interaction vis intense and the leader, typically the creative director, plays a central role in determining which ideas are developed for presentation. At the end of the day, success is unlikely. As in baseball, batting .300 and a hitting a few home runs is great performance.

When a team takes on a project for an established account, the team members have worked together before. The client's tastes are well known. Brainstorming rapidly converges on good-enough ideas, and the creative director's role as decider between ideas becomes less central. Relatively little communication is sufficient to achieve consensus. In terms of number of ads produced, these teams may outperform the new-pitch teams. They rarely win renown for brilliant innovations.

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